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Wed, 16 May 2018 11:22:46 +0000
Now Playing at the Packard Campus Theater (May 24, 2018)
The following is a guest post by Jenny Paxson of the Packard Campus. Thursday, May 24 (7:30 p.m.) The Prince and the Pauper (Warner Bros., 1937) In this rousing adaptation of Mark Twain’s novel set in Tudor England, the discontented Prince Edward (Bobby Mauch) trades places with penniless Tom Canty (Billy Mauch)–a dead ringer for […]

What a long, strange trip it has been. Some time ago, when I offered to help a colleague try to identify some super-obscure movie stills I had no idea….

It started almost three years ago. The Moving Image section of the LOC had just acquired a vast collection—30,000 photos!—of (mostly) movie and TV stills from a former collector/vendor from the New Jersey area.  Thankfully, of the 30K pictures, the overwhelming majority of them were properly, correctly, identified and foldered.  But about 1,000 were loose and unlabeled.  The staff of the division then went to work.

(For a full recounting of this process, please see my previous blog: “The Trail (and Trial) of the Mystery Movie Photos.”)

Of the unidentified 1,000 or so photos, we were able to successfully ID about 800 inhouse. But those final 200!  Unable to ID them ourselves, we then turned to crowd-sourcing, via this blog.  Twenty different times we posted collections of unknown stills and appealed to America for its assistance.  And America didn’t disappoint!

To our surprise, and great gratitude, many people throughout the country adopted our problem as their problem and took on the task of ID-ing some of these super-obscure pictures as a personal pet cause. They took them and ran with them—taking them to Reddit, to their Facebook pages and sharing them among friends and family.

Sometimes to find the rightful name, to “solve” the picture, it took just one person, sometimes it took a whole lot of people. Here’s the behind-the-scenes tales of some of our most unique images and how we discovered just who—or what—they were.

CAPTIVE AUDIENCE

You see this group? We went, literally, around the world before we learned the identities of these folks.  For about half the people I showed this picture to in the beginning, they said, “They look English!”  (How one “looks English,” I never contemplated.)  But it was a lead I nevertheless followed, sending e-mails across the Atlantic to every Brit TV fan group site and every would-be Monty Python wannabe I could find.

Beloved UK actress Pauline McLynn was a popular choice for the lady on the far left. After I asked one British TV aficionado if then, perhaps, this picture was of McLynn and the rest of the cast of McLynn’s 1990s Brit-com “Father Ted,” the online responder asked, “Are you mad?!”

To which, I responded, “No, just American.”

Another early poster though thought that two of the people in the picture looked like two well-known German TV sketch performers. So, after posting that possibility, suddenly I found myself on all sorts of German-themed webpages and fansites, hoping that my Google translation to German was at least basically serviceable.

Eventually, though, I was told “Nein.”

Finally, someone from the other side of the pond, noticed the fire escape visible in the back of the picture and noted that fire escapes are more of a US thing than a worldwide thing. This brought us back to the US.

For those who didn’t think the group was British, they sure thought that the lady at the far right was former “AfterMASH” actress Brandis Kemp. As Kemp began her career on the 1980s ABC late comedy sketch show “Fridays,” many suggesters then decided to try to shoehorn in the identities of some of Kemp’s one-time “Fridays” co-horts onto the faces of those in the picture–without success.  Finally, the Library reached out to Ms. Kemp herself and she informed us that the lady in the photo was not her.

Still thinking it must be some sort of comedy troupe—one morning I dashed the scan off to Carl Kissin, the longtime purveyor of a NYC improv group called Chicago City Limits.  Carl took it from there, sharing the photo with some of his friends and former improv-ers.

Finally, a friend of Carl’s, an actress, said that the woman on the far right was a former co-star of hers named Georgia Harrell. Harrell appeared in some 1980s-era movie comedies and once did a guest spot on “Perfect Strangers.”

That got the ball rolling…. It took the assistance of a few others before we got in touch with Ms. Harrell who informed us that this was her and her co-stars in a circa 1982 NYC improv toupe named Captive Audience.

From left to right, then, the group is: Beth Rake, Philippe Ruskin, John McCarthy, and Ms. Harrell; Brendon Elliot is in the back.

Ah, mystery solved!

“THE GREAT AIR ROBBERY”

If it took a village to solve the “Captive Audience” picture, it nearly took a whole city to solve this one.

It’s a distinctive image to be sure, a terrified woman seemingly underground and being menaced by a “monster” wearing a gas mask and some long johns. Surely anyone who had ever seen this movie couldn’t forget it…could they?

After it was first posted by the LOC in September 2016, an early commenter assured us that this image was from a French film he had once seen. So, that, for a time, sent us all down a French-centric rabbit hole.

But…a couple of others looking at the photo, said that the background had to be the BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit) system of San Francisco.

Then…the appearance of the woman in foreground—especially her heavy eyebrows—for many brought to mind the work of eccentric, legendary avant garde filmmaker George Kuchar. The late Kuchar spent the majority of his career in the Bay Area!   AHA!

But… various Kuchar scholars, when consulted, could not place the image to any known Kuchar work.

Soon, a couple of truly dedicated San Franciscans took on the challenged of this photo. They reached out to the BART system—was a permit ever obtained to film something there?—and to the San Francisco Film Office.  From there, the picture made its way to local newspaper, the “San Francisco Gate,” and then to local TV station KTVU, who ran a morning newscast story on this mystery picture.  (Me:  What have we started?!)

Luckily, watching the news that morning was a woman who works with the long-running SF theater company the San Francisco Mime Troupe. She recognized the woman in the photo as Mime performer Andrea Snow.  She then alerted others who had been with the Mime Troupe longer who were then able to ID the production.

This, then, is a publicity shot, taken in the 24th/Mission BART station, but not for a film, but for an original stage show titled “The Great Air Robbery.” It was staged in 1974 in San Francisco.  Ms. Snow co-wrote the script and, today, remains active with the group.

Perhaps the only question that remains about the photo now is how this picture made its way across the country and landed with the original collector in New Jersey…? Alas, that’s a mystery that we will probably never solve…

FRANCES WALLER

After exploring and abandoning many good guesses for this photo like Patsy Cline and Maxene Andrews, it finally took some modern-day science to unearth the identity of this almost 70 year-old photo.

Often for press photos sent out to newspapers across the country in hopes they’d be reprinted, information about the photo (the name of the performer, title of the program and where/when it was airing, etc.) was printed on a piece of paper and attached with glue to the back of the original photo. Unfortunately, for our purposes, often these pieces of paper got torn off or lost along the way.  But, for this particular still, the description was adhered long enough for some of the text to bleed (as you can see) onto the lower third of the image.  Luckily, at the Library of Congress, we have a way of reading things like that.

So we sent the still to our preservation lab who, using a spectral imaging system, was able to decipher some of the faded words. This is what it said:  “From: J. [?] Thompson Company, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York” and “[?]aft Television Theatre, December 22, 1949.”

That “—aft” is “Kraft Television Theatre,” an early and long-running TV anthology program. Thanks to that title, and the date, we were quickly able to zero in on this mystery woman.

The lady in question is actress Frances Waller. She appeared on this late 1949 “Kraft” episode titled “New Broom.”  She did some stage work in New York and toured in some plays before, seemingly, retiring.  If you look her up on her IMDB, you will see that her film and TV career was very short—she has only two credits listed, with “Broom” being one of them.

“SWEET TORTURE”

These two shots—both from the same film–bedeviled me for the longest time. It became something of an obsession and also one that I thought I’d go to my grave before I ever saw solved.

This one was particularly frustrating as we had many clues. For many film stills, the initials of the film’s title (say, like “GWTW” for “Gone With the Wind”) or the initials of the subject (say like, “MM” for Marilyn Monroe) are printed in one of the lower corners of the photo.  This pic, very clearly reads “SC” in the corner and, in theory, that should have given us a major advantage in determining what film it was from.  Not only that, but the woman’s dress and her knee-high boots (in photo number two, for example) clearly bespoke of the late 1960s or early ‘70s.  So we had an era and something of a title.  How hard could this be to ID?

You’d be surprised.

After I tried and gave up on this being from the US film “Shock Corridor” (and I tried believe me!), and decided it wasn’t from the notorious film “Sugar Cookies,” either, for months, I stewed. And for every film poster I saw, every movie I saw playing on TV, I immediately double-checked in my head, “Are its initials ‘SC’?!”

Finally, a full year (or more) after it was first posted on the blog, a foreign film fan, said that they thought these images were from a 1971 French film titled “Les Aveux Les Plus Doux” which translates to “The Sweetest Confessions”!  But….unfortunately for me, when the film was imported into the USA, it first underwent a title change and became known stateside as “Sweet Torture.”  No wonder, then, I could never link it up with the “SC” initials!

***

As of this writing, there are still about 60 images that have yet to fully ID.

We have long ago given up the idea of ever “solving” every last one of them; some of these individuals are just too obscure. (Had it not been for the gift of modern technology, I doubt we ever would have solved the Waller photo.)

But, because we don’t like leaving a job unfinished, we will continue to hold out hope that more of these images will, in time, be seen by just the right person who has the answer. (To my great surprise, so far no one yet has contacted me to say, “Hey, that’s me!” or “That’s my mom!,” etc., as surely many of the people or their heirs are still very much around.)

To me, these photos, and the people in them, linger like lost souls, that, at the very least, are entitled to the dignity of an identity. And you may wonder why it matters at all if so many of these people are so obscure.  Because even the “obscure, the “unknown,” shouldn’t be forgotten.  At the Library of Congress, we hate to see anything be lost to history.

***

As mentioned, some of our photos are still in need of “solving”; they can be found at the three following links:

Who Am I? (Part 1)

Who Am I? (Part 2)

Who Am I (Part 3)

 


Mon, 14 May 2018 11:14:03 +0000
Hard-Won Victories: Solving the Mystery of Some “Mystery Photos”
What a long, strange trip it has been. Some time ago, when I offered to help a colleague try to identify some super-obscure movie stills I had no idea…. It started almost three years ago. The Moving Image section of the LOC had just acquired a vast collection—30,000 photos!—of (mostly) movie and TV stills from […]

The following is a post by Jenny Paxson of the Packard Campus.

Dam Busters (Warner Bros., 1955)

Thursday, May 17 (7:30 p.m.)
The Dam Busters (Warner Bros., 1955)
This British epic war film depicts the true story of the May 16, 1943 “Operation Chastise,” when the RAF’s 617 Squadron attacked the Ruhr dams in Nazi Germany with British engineer Barnes Wallis’s bouncing bomb, an explosive designed to drop into reservoirs and cause massive flooding to Germany’s industrial hub. The Dam Busters takes a documentary-like approach, focusing in the first part on the development and testing of the special bomb and, in the second section, the carefully orchestrated preparations for the mission and its execution. The film was a financial and critical success, receiving special praise for its accuracy, direction, cinematography and special effects. Directed by Michael Anderson, the first-rate British cast includes Michael Redgrave, Richard Todd, Derek Farr and Basil Sydney. 118 min.

Friday, May 18 – Closed

Saturday, May 19 (7:30 p.m.)
Emile Pandolfi – Live
Premier pianist Emile Pandolfi will perform a program of popular music. Receiving his degree in piano performance and best known for his arrangements, Emile’s favorite music to arrange comes from Broadway musicals. “In addition to being melodically fulfilling, these songs usually contain meaningful lyrics and lend themselves to interesting arrangement.” In many of his arrangements one can hear the influence of his favorite composers, Rachmaninoff, Debussy and Chopin, accounting for the sensitivity and passion with which he plays. Recording since 1991, the pianist‘s CDs of familiar music have sold well over three million copies nationally. This has earned Emile the distinction of being the top-selling artist in the alternative music industry, distributed primarily in specialty, gift and book shops across the nation. Now with 30+ albums, most major online retailers also carry his music for download and he can be streamed from internet radio stations all over the world. Tickets are required for this free event and can be reserved at https://emile.eventbrite.com.

Sunday, May 20 (7:30 p.m.)
M2duO – Live
Made up of violinist Machiko Ozawa and pianist Makia Matsumura, the M2duO are often billed as a “Japanese tango duo.” Ozawa and Matsumura both graduated from The Tokyo University of Arts and studied at The Juilliard School. They started performing together at the Café Mozart in New York City’s Upper West Side where they started to play Astor Piazzolla’s tango scores and went on to arrange and play oldies from their home country reinvented as tango pieces. Aside from their growing love for tango, they have each pursued their own unique paths:  for Ozawa, it was “tap violin” (tap-dancing while performing the violin) and new sounds with the electric violin; for Matsumura, it was silent film accompaniment. Such individual musical adventures have added more depth, range, fun, and originality to their performance as a duo, making them the unique ensemble you hear today. In this special evening, the M2duO will present their all-time favorites – Piazzolla, Japanese-oldies-turned-tango– as well as their originals with Ozawa on her electric violin. Tickets are required for this free event and can be reserved at https://m2duo.eventbrite.com.

For more information on our programs, please visit the website at: www.loc.gov/avconservation/theater/.


Wed, 09 May 2018 11:42:36 +0000
Now Playing at the Packard Campus Theater (May 17; 19-20, 2018)
The following is a post by Jenny Paxson of the Packard Campus. Thursday, May 17 (7:30 p.m.) The Dam Busters (Warner Bros., 1955) This British epic war film depicts the true story of the May 16, 1943 “Operation Chastise,” when the RAF’s 617 Squadron attacked the Ruhr dams in Nazi Germany with British engineer Barnes […]

Thanks to everyone who has offered suggestions for our myriad of unknown photos over the past few weeks.  We have just a few more to ask you about.  Please take a look and take a guess.  As always “clicking” on any of the thumbnails below will increase the photo in size.  Also, we will be updating this blog regularly as solid leads and solutions come in.  THANK YOU!!!

  1.  At one time we thought this was well-known character actor George E. Stone.  But we’ve since changed our minds.  Who is he?

2.  That is actor Ian Ziering but who is the woman with him?

UPDATE:  By the way, the LOC did reach out to Mr. Ziering but he doesn’t recall who the lady with him is.

3.  This illustration seems solidly inspired by the work of artist Surayama Hajime but it not by him.  Anyone know who it is by or where it was used?

4.  This man is turning his radio.  Anyone recognize him?

5.  Anyone recognize the lady with the microphone?

6.  We once that this was a well-known travel/airline exec but we now have changed our minds on that too.  So who is he?  Considering the rest of this collection, he’s probably involved in film somehow.

7.  This lady has an odd way of wearing a necklace.  Anyone know who she is?

8.  On the back of this photo it reads, in pencil, “The Apprentice with Mr. McGrath.”  We believe that is character actor Paul McGrath on the right.  Who is the woman on the left?  We know that the photo is by Howard F. LaChance, a long-time New York state news photographer.  We wonder if the woman in the photo was an apprentice to him.  There is also a date on the back; it reads:  “Jul 31 1968.”

9.  Is this just a Mary Martin fan posing with a poster?  We don’t know.  We are open to suggestions as to who he is.

10.  Finally, we have this shot.  According to the back, also above, it is an example of a make-up job by legendary movie make-up artist Bob Stephanoff.  It has a date on the back that seems to read:  “Dec 15 1938.”  And there is a note that reads:  “The Bulgarian Phesant [Peasant?]”  Who is this man and was this utilized in a film?

To see our two prior blogs of “unknowns,” some still awaiting solutions, please see the links below.

Who Am I? (Part 1)

Who Am I (Part 2)

 


Tue, 08 May 2018 13:20:30 +0000
Who Am I? (Part 3 of 3)
Thanks to everyone who has offered suggestions for our myriad of unknown photos over the past few weeks.

Mon, 07 May 2018 12:09:03 +0000
At the Packard Campus–June 2018
To coincide with “Baseball Americana,” a major new exhibit at the Library’s Thomas Jefferson Building opening on June 29, the Great American Pastime will be celebrated at the Library of Congress Packard Campus Theater with screenings of ten baseball movies. The series will include film biographies of Grover Cleveland Alexander (“The Winning Team”), James A. […]

The following is a guest post by Jenny Paxson of the Packard Campus.

Thursday, May 10 (7:30 p.m.)
The Sting (Universal, 1973)
Robert Redford plays a Depression-era con man seeking revenge on the racketeer (Robert Shaw) responsible for the murder of his mentor. He enlists the aid of confidence artist extraordinaire Paul Newman to gather together an impressive array of con men eager to settle the score with Shaw. One of the biggest hits of the early ’70s, The Sting picked up seven Oscars including Best Picture, Director, Screenplay and Best Adapted Score for Marvin Hamlisch’s unforgettable setting of Scott Joplin’s ragtime music. The film was added to the National Film Registry in 2005. Rated PG. 129 min.

Sahara (Columbia, 1943)

Friday, May 11 (7:30 p.m.)
Sahara (Columbia, 1943)
The Packard Campus Theater is presenting three films to commemorate the 75th anniversary of significant events of WWII from May 11 – 17. The action in Sahara takes place in Libya during the Western Desert Campaign and was released just six months after the surrender of Axis forces in North Africa. Setting out to rejoin the American command after the fall of Tobruk, American tank commander Sgt. Joe Gunn (Humphrey Bogart) and his U.S. crew pick up five British soldiers, a Frenchman, and a Sudanese man with an Italian prisoner as they cross the Libyan Desert. The group becomes a microcosm of the Allied forces as they work together to defeat a much larger German unit. Directed by Zoltan Korda, this tense and exciting drama received widespread critical acclaim and three Oscar nominations including Best Supporting Actor for J. Carrol Naish as the Italian prisoner. 97 min.

Saturday, May 12 (7:30 p.m.)
The Pianist (Focus Features, 1984 – R-Rated*)
Adrien Brody won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his sensitive portrayal of famed Polish pianist Wladyslaw Szpilman as he struggles to survive the onslaught of Nazi tyranny during World War II in this drama based on his memoirs. A composer and pianist, Szpilman was playing live on the radio in Warsaw when the station was bombed during Nazi Germany’s invasion of Poland. Szpilman and his family were soon forced from their home into the overcrowded Warsaw Ghetto. He later aided the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising (April 19 – May 16, 1943), the largest single revolt by Jews during World War II. Szpilman eventually reclaimed his artistic gifts, and confronted his fears–with aid from an unlikely source. The film also won Oscars for Best Director (Roman Polanski) and Best Adapted Screenplay (Ronald Harwood) and was nominated for Best Picture of the year. 150 min. *No one under the age of 17 will be admitted without a parent or guardian.

For more information on our programs, please visit the website at: www.loc.gov/avconservation/theater/.

 


Wed, 02 May 2018 11:11:30 +0000
Now Playing at the Packard Campus Theater (May 10-12, 2018)
The following is a guest post by Jenny Paxson of the Packard Campus. Thursday, May 10 (7:30 p.m.) The Sting (Universal, 1973) Robert Redford plays a Depression-era con man seeking revenge on the racketeer (Robert Shaw) responsible for the murder of his mentor. He enlists the aid of confidence artist extraordinaire Paul Newman to gather […]

Last week, we posted on this blog 30 photos that the Library of Congress is attempting to ID.  We were overjoyed by the response we got!  Thank you to all!  Now in our second (and last) post, we have here 30 additional photos also in need of a “solution.”  As always, “clicking” on the thumbnail below will increase the photo in size.  Please add your comments below and we will update this blog as the photos are positively ID’ed or quality suggestions come in. Many thanks!

  1. We’ve had several guesses for this guy–Lawrence Gray, Grant Withers….?  But, so far, nothing has stuck.  Who do you think it is?  UPDATE:  Is this Don Terry?

2.  We have several shots of this young lady but, sadly, no name to put with her face.

UPDATE:  The guess of Alexa Davalos was a good one but Ms. Davalos’s management say it is not her.

3.  We know this photo was taken by Katherine Russell Bleecker, the first female cinematographer in film history.  Does anyone recognize the men in the picture or, if it is from a film what film?

4.  Well, these two are ice skaters and she’s dressed like a car.  Hopefully that will assist everyone in finding out who–and what–they are.

SOLVED!:  From an “Ice Capades” show, “Motorama,” c. 1955.  Thanks, Fred M.

5.  The code in the lower corner of his still says “SS: KOD,” perhaps the initials of the film it is from.  Note also the large cake (?) aflame in the center of the photo.

SOLVED!:  “The Magic Garden of Stanley Sweetheart” (1970)–Thank you, Paul!

6.  The name of gentleman at his desk may never be learned but you never know, so we have posted it here.

UPDATE:  There is a certificate on the wall behind this gentleman from the Sesostris organization but we haven’t had any luck zooming in on it.  And, when we reached out to the Sesostris group, they were not able to ID the man.

7.  Quite possibly a silent film actor or early stage star.  Could it be George Magrill?

8.  Due to the glasses on this guy we may never learn a name.  But we will ask.

9.  This is a photo of a painting signed “Kepler.”  Who is Kepler?  And was this painting perhaps used in a film?

10.  This man might be a character actor, a film exec or a business man.  We don’t know…

11.  This is a pretty lady in a unique hat–but what is her name?

UPDATE:  Could this be Marina Vlady?  We’ve reached out to her reps overseas.

12.  This lady took a tumble on her skis.  Might it be Andrea Leeds (as has been suggested)?

UPDATE:  We reached out to the Ava Gardner Museum on this one and they don’t believe it to be her.

13.  Yes, another somewhat odd photo that is–probably–not from a film.  Still, does anyone recognize this women or, perhaps, the mural that is behind her?

14.  We assume this woman is from New York based, obviously, on what she’s holding, but who she is is yet to be learned.

15.  This has been a “fun” one.  On the back of the photo it appears someone has scribbled “Virginia” and it has a date on it, stamped, April 9, 1946.  But we haven’t been able to figure out any more.

SOLVED!:  Former Powers Model Virginia H. Hopkins.

16. Maybe this lady is an actress, a singer….?

17.  Could this be Edwina Booth? Jeannette Loff? Or neither?

18.  This might be a make-up how-to shot (note the 3D effect on her forehead).  On the back is a stamp that reads “Ashley & Assoc.” plus a non-working NYC phone number.

19.  We don’t know the name of this gent either–is he behind the scenes talent or perhaps an author?

20.  We wonder if this is the handsome actor Bill Cable, who played, among other roles, the handsome murder victim at the start of “Basic Instinct”?

 

21.  We aren’t sure that this is a “celebrity” at all but we thought we’d ask.  It might just be a “stock shot” that made it into this collection.  We are open to your thoughts.

22.  The background is Austria, but who is the woman in the foreground?

23.  At first, we thought this was a proposed film set, but now we think it might have been a proposal for a new Cineplex.  Does anybody recognize this from their home town?

24.  Left to right are Karyn Parsons, the artist formerly known as Terrence Trent D’Arby and then actress Lori Petty.  But who is the woman on the end?

UPDATE:  We reached out to both Ms. Parsons and Ms. Petty and neither could recall the woman on the end.  We have yet to hear back from Mr. “D’Arby.”

25.  We think this might be vaudeville star Stella Mayhew.  What say you?

26.  We don’t know either of these men standing in front of the plane.

27.  We believe the actor on the right is Bob Custer, silent Western star.  Who is the actress next to him?

28.  We don’t know who this studious looking man is either.

SOLVED!:  Fred Foy, long-time narrator for “The Lone Ranger” and other radio series.

29.  The man on the far left is actor Howard De Silva.  We don’t know the names of the other two men with him.  (There is a date on the back of this photo:  Jan. 19, 1973 and a stamps that reads “SHERLOCK,” perhaps the photographer.)

30.  Is the man behind the camera Ben Maddow….?

To see the “mystery photos” we posted last month–many still waiting “solutions”–see the link below:

Who Am I?

 

 

 


Mon, 30 Apr 2018 11:19:07 +0000
Mystery Photos: Who Am I? (Part 2)
Last week, we posted on this blog 30 photos that the Library of Congress is attempting to ID.

Mon, 23 Apr 2018 11:17:04 +0000
Now Playing at the Packard Campus Theater (May 3-5, 2018)
The following is a guest post by Jenny Paxson of the Packard Campus. Thursday, May 3 (7:30 p.m.) Overboard (MGM/UA, 1987) Spoiled heiress Joanna Stayton (Goldie Hawn) hires carpenter Dean Proffitt (Kurt Russell) to build a closet on her yacht, then refuses to pay when the project is completed. When Joanna accidentally falls overboard and […]

The following is a guest post by Jenny Paxson of the Packard Campus.

A Day at the Races (MGM, 1937)

Thursday, April 26 (7:30 p.m.)
A Day at the Races (MGM, 1937)
In this classic Marx Brothers comedy, veterinarian Hugo Z. Hackenbush (Groucho Marx) is hired as chief of staff for the financially troubled Standish Sanitarium at the insistence of wealthy hypochondriac patient Mrs. Emily Upjohn (Margaret Dumont). Soon after, the facility’s owner Judy Standish (Maureen O’Sullivan) finds herself caught up in the world of horse racing after her fiancé (Allan Jones) blows his life savings on a racehorse named Hi-Hat with the hopes of winning enough money to avoid foreclosure for the sanitarium. Zany shenanigans ensue by jockey Harpo Marx and racing tipster Chico Marx. Directed by Sam Wood, the film features some of the trio’s funniest set pieces including “Tutsi Fruitsy Ice Cream” and Chico selling racing tip books to Groucho. 111 mins.

Friday, April 27 (7:30 p.m.)
Mutiny on the Bounty (MGM, 1935)
This fact-based epic classic is an engrossing adaptation of the Nordhoff-Hall book about a clash of wills between the tyrannical Captain Bligh (Charles Laughton) and his mutinous crew led by Fletcher Christian (Clark Gable) aboard the HMS Bounty, an 18th-century British merchantman in the South Seas. Directed by Frank Lloyd, “Mutiny on the Bounty” won the Best Picture Academy Award. It was the only film to receive three nominations for the Academy Award for Best Actor: Clark Gable, Charles Laughton, and Franchot Tone. Because of this, the Academy introduced a Best Supporting Actor Oscar the following year. 132 min.

Back Pay (Paramount, 1922)

Saturday, April 28 (7:30 p.m.)
Back Pay (Paramount, 1922)
Directed by Frank Borzage, winner of the first Best Director Academy Award (for “Seventh Heaven” in 1927), this romantic drama stars Seena Owen as Hester Bevins, a simple country girl who yearns for adventure. Though she has a handsome young man, Jerry, who is devoted to her, she leaves her village and goes to New York in search of a grander life. There she becomes the lover of a wealthy and unscrupulous businessman. But when Jerry returns blinded and dying from the war, Hester must choose between her new life and the man whose loyalty to her has never failed. Frances Marion wrote the screenplay based on a short story of the same name by Fannie Hurst. This 35 mm tinted film print was restored by the Library of Congress Motion Picture Conservation Center. 70 min. The 10 min. short “Federated Screen Review # 5” will precede the feature.  Live musical accompaniment will be provided by Andrew Simpson.

For more information on our programs, please visit the website at: www.loc.gov/avconservation/theater/.


Wed, 18 Apr 2018 10:50:46 +0000
Now Playing at the Packard Campus Theater (April 26-28, 2018)
The following is a guest post by Jenny Paxson of the Packard Campus. Thursday, April 26 (7:30 p.m.) A Day at the Races (MGM, 1937) In this classic Marx Brothers comedy, veterinarian Hugo Z. Hackenbush (Groucho Marx) is hired as chief of staff for the financially troubled Standish Sanitarium at the insistence of wealthy hypochondriac […]

Regular readers of the “Now See Hear!” blog know that for the past year or so, we’ve been trying to identify some super-obscure film- , TV- and music-related photos.  Though we’ve had an over 50% success rate, we still have some enduring “unknowns.”  To try to facilitate some more solutions, we’ve gathered 30 of our remaining mysteries below.  As always, “clicking” on the each of the thumbnails below will increase it in size.  Please add guesses/solutions in the comments section below.  We’ll be updating this blog as each image is “ID-ed.”  THANK YOU!!

UPDATE:  We are absolutely THRILLED by the incredible response we got to this group of photos and we will investigate and verify all the suggestions.  We’ve added updates to some of the pictures below….

 



1. This gentleman (above) with the bow-tie looks familiar but we don’t know his name.

2. We’d like to know the name of this trio–either as a group or individually.

3.  Anyone recognize this guy?

UPDATE:  Could this be Irish actor Noel Willman?

4.  The man with the beard and the glasses looks familiar but we don’t–yet–know who he is.

SOLVED:  Director Harold Becker!

5.  We thought this gent was Bruno Ganz, but we’ve since had that disproven.  Who is he?

UPDATE:  Could this be French actor Jean-Louis Trintignant?

 6.  The rest of this photo is NSFW.  Can anyone recognize her face?

7.  This is NOT Dana Delany or Stephanie Zimbalist or Bonnie Bedelia.  Who is she?

8.  Does anyone recognize this lady with the hoops?

UPDATE:  We thought this might be Phylicia Rashad but she says “no.”  Could this be former Miss America Debbye Turner?

9.  This photo might be UK in origin due to where it was found in the collection.  Who is this song and dance lady?

UPDATE:  Could this be one-time UK Eurovision singer Patricia Bredin?

10.  There’s a two-letter code on this photo:  “TC.”  That might be the initials of the woman in the photo or the initials of the film she is appearing in.  Or it might be neither.

11.  This photo is from White Studios, a busy NY-based vaudeville and Broadway photographer at one time.  But who is the subject?

12.  We are still trying to ID this actress or the exotic film she is in.

13.  No one, so far, has recognized this duo.

UPDATE:  We thought this might be Wendy and Lisa but Wendy and Lisa say “no.”  Could this be the Jacobites Christian Death?

14.  Who is the man with the carnation?

SOLVED!:  This is Walter Reade, Jr., founder of the Walter Reade Organization, a one-time big-time arthouse film distributor.

15.  And who is this well-dressed man?

16.  This has been a fun one:  Is this a local horror host?  Is it from a production of Jekyll and Hyde?

17.  Who is the man with the glasses?

UPDATE:  British comedy writer Denis Norden?

18.  This one has frustrated many.  He looks very familiar.  But we don’t know who he is.

19.  Here’s a series of styled shots for an unknown personality.

UPDATE:    Thomas Jane?

20.  We’d like to know the name of either of these two young men.

21.  Someone thought this was Shel Silverstein, but we know that’s not true.  So any guesses?

UPDATE:  The cartoon in the back is by Herb Gardner but that is not Gardner in the foreground.

22.  These creatures must be in a movie or TV production of some sort–but what?

23.  The identity of this director might never be solved because his face is so obscured.  His hat reads “Tucson Rodeo” if that helps anyone.

SOLVED!:  Geoffrey Sax.

24.  We assume that this is a musical group.  But their name is so far unknown.

25.  This has got to be a production of ”Knickerbocker Holiday” based upon the set, costumes, and date on the stage.  But it doesn’t sync up with the Hollywood version or the Broadway debut.  Suggestions?

26.  This fetching lass is, so far, without a name.

27.  At one time, we thought this was British actress Suzy Mandel–and even Ms. Mandel said it looked like her!–but it’s not.  Who is she?

28.  Blond ambition:  This MIGHT be from a film but which one?

UPDATE:  The woman in the foreground is wearing a graduation cap and there’s an “86” on it.

29.  So many people thought this was Juliet Prowse, we eventually reached out to the late Ms. Proswe’s son who informed us that the photo is not of his mom.

 


30.  This shot is probably from Brazilian film–due to a stamp on the front, or from another country south of the border–but we haven’t been able to ID it or the lady in the photo.

UPDATE:  The censorship stamp is from Unida Filmes and dates this still from between 1958 and 1964.  Could this be Marina Marcel?

 



Mystery Photos: Who Am I?
Regular readers of the “Now See Hear!” blog know that for the past year or so, we’ve been trying to identify some super-obscure film- , TV- and music-related photos.
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