All Hot News World. Public world blog, journal online reviewed.

Watson Lectures «Ńaltech.Edu»

RSS feed: Watson Lectures «Ńaltech.Edu»
Fri, 16 Nov 2018 22:30:00 +0000
Caltech News tagged with "Watson_Lecture"
[ + ]
Mon, 22 Oct 2018 18:09:24 +0000
World’s Deepest-Penetration and Fastest Optical Cameras
Caltech’s Lihong Wang will discuss his development of photoacoustic tomography during his November 28 Watson Lecture.
image
An image created using photoacoustic computed tomography, a technique that could one day replace mammograms for finding breast cancer.
Credit: Li Lin and Lihong V. Wang

Lihong Wang, whose Watson Lecture will be held on November 28, will discuss the development of photoacoustic tomography, which allows scientists to peer deep into biological tissue. He will also talk about his lab's development of compressed ultrafast photography that records 10 trillion frames per second. At 10 orders of magnitude faster than commercially available technologies, it can capture light propagation, the fastest phenomenon in the universe.

Wang is the Bren Professor of Medical Engineering and Electrical Engineering in Caltech's Division of Engineering and Applied Science. His research focuses on developing novel biomedical imaging techniques with applications for early cancer detection, surgical guidance, and brain imaging. His team has also developed the world's fastest camera, capable of capturing light-speed phenomena in real time. Wang's Monte Carlo model of photon transport in scattering media is used worldwide as a standard tool. He received his bachelor's degree (1984) and his master's degree (1987) from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, and his PhD (1992) from Rice University. He joined Caltech as a Bren Professor in 2017.

The lecture—which will be held at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, November 28, in Beckman Auditorium—is a free event; no tickets or reservations are required.

Named for the late Caltech professor Earnest C. Watson, who founded the series in 1922, the Watson Lectures present Caltech and JPL researchers describing their work to the public. Many past Watson Lectures are available online at Caltech's YouTube site.

[ + ]
Fri, 11 May 2018 16:39:16 +0000
Space Solar Power: A New Beginning
Caltech’s Sergio Pellegrino will discuss his work on the Caltech Space Solar Power Project during his October 31 Watson Lecture.
photo of Sergio Pellegrino
Sergio Pellegrino

In 1968, Peter Glaser, the father of space solar power, envisaged kilometer-scale space systems comprising solar collectors and transmitting antennas that would beam power to the earth from geostationary orbit, but that dream has remained elusive. Until now.

In his October 31 Watson Lecture, the first in the 2018–19 series, Caltech's Sergio Pellegrino will discuss the Caltech Space Solar Power Project's pursuit to conceive, design, and demonstrate a scalable vision for a constellation of ultralight modular spacecraft that collect sunlight, transform it into electrical power, and wirelessly beam that electricity to the earth. The basic module of this future solar power system is a giant coilable structure that elastically deploys after launch into orbit and is made of paper-thin materials of high stiffness.

Pellegrino is the Joyce and Kent Kresa Professor of Aerospace and Civil Engineering, a Jet Propulsion Laboratory Senior Research Scientist, and co-director of the Space Solar Power Project. He is president of the International Association for Shell and Spatial Structures (IASS). Pellegrino's research focuses on lightweight structures and particularly on problems involving packaging, deployment, shape control, and stability of space structures. He received his Laurea degree from the University of Naples in 1982 and his PhD from the University of Cambridge in 1986. He has been a Caltech professor since 2007 and a Jet Propulsion Laboratory senior research scientist since 2009. He began his work on space-based solar power in 2014.

The lecture—which will be held at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, October 31, in Beckman Auditorium—is a free event; no tickets or reservations are required.

Named for the late Caltech professor Earnest C. Watson, who founded the series in 1922, the Watson Lectures present Caltech and JPL researchers describing their work to the public. Many past Watson Lectures are available online at Caltech's YouTube site.

[ + ]
Mon, 02 Apr 2018 18:42:04 +0000
Talking to Cells: Watson Lecture Preview
Mikhail Shapiro will discuss the challenges associated with treating patients with engineered cells
News Writer: 
Sharon Kaplan
Mikhail Shapiro
Mikhail Shapiro

Treating patients with engineered cells may one day become as common as treating them with drugs is now. As therapeutic agents, cells are much more sophisticated than simple molecules: they can be engineered to migrate to sites of disease, sense their local environment, make logical decisions, multiply themselves, release therapeutic molecules, and self-destruct. However, there are no effective ways to monitor their location in the body or tell them where to perform their therapeutic functions.

During his May 23 Biedebach Memorial Lecture of the Watson Lecture series, Mikhail Shapiro—who is an assistant professor of chemical engineering and a Schlinger Scholar at Caltech as well as a Heritage Medical Research Institute Investigator—will discuss solutions to this problem, including developing molecular "communications equipment" that will use methods such as ultrasound to remotely monitor cells' activity and give them commands deep inside the body.

Shapiro's group develops molecular technologies for noninvasive imaging and control of cellular function, and uses these technologies to study basic biology and create cellular diagnostics and therapeutics. By using various forms of energy—from magnetic to mechanical, thermal, and chemical—Shapiro and his colleagues pursue fundamental advances at the interface of molecular and cellular engineering and physics.

Shapiro received his bachelor's degree from Brown University in 2004 and his PhD from MIT in 2008. Shapiro became an assistant professor at Caltech in 2014.

Shapiro's Biedebach Memorial Lecture will be held at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, May 23, in Beckman Auditorium, and is a free event; no tickets or reservations are required.

Named for the late Caltech professor Earnest C. Watson, who founded the series in 1922, the Watson Lectures present Caltech and JPL researchers describing their work to the public. Many past Watson Lectures are available online at Caltech's YouTube site.

[ + ]
Thu, 11 Jan 2018 19:51:08 +0000
Microbial Life Support: The Invisible Living Networks that Shape Our Oceans
Watson Lecture Preview
Victoria Orphan
Victoria Orphan

While invisible to the naked eye, microorganisms and their interactions with each other and their environment play fundamental roles in the cycling of elements critical to life on our planet. In deep ocean sediments, billions of microorganisms compete and cooperate via a complex network of metabolic interactions that are still poorly understood, but are important in the cycling of methane and sequestration of carbon.

In her April 11 Watson Lecture, Victoria J. Orphan (PhD '02), the James Irvine Professor of Environmental Science and Geobiology in Caltech's Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, will talk about the activities of marine microorganisms from those at the ocean surface to those deep in the earth's crust, and will consider the globally important geochemical processes they orchestrate through metabolic collaboration.

Orphan's specific research interests include the structure and function of microbial communities in the deep subsurface, deep ocean sediments, oil and gas seeps, and environments that represent analogs for that of early Earth; her work has a specific emphasis on the interactions that occur between microbes that produce and consume methane. Orphan earned her PhD at the UC Santa Barbara in 2001, and started at Caltech as an assistant professor 2004, and was named the James Irvine Professor of Environmental Science and Geobiology in 2016.

The lecture—which will be held at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, April 11, in Beckman Auditorium—is a free event; no tickets or reservations are required.

Named for the late Caltech professor Earnest C. Watson, who founded the series in 1922, the Watson Lectures present Caltech and JPL researchers describing their work to the public. Many past Watson Lectures are available online at Caltech's YouTube site.

[ + ]
Tue, 31 Oct 2017 18:35:43 +0000
Flat Metasurface Optics: Watson Lecture Preview
Andrei Faraon will discuss how nanotechnology enables new ways to make optical components

Flat Metasurface Optics - A. Faraon - 1/17/2018

Flat Metasurface Optics - A. Faraon - 1/17/2018
Watch the lecture recorded on January 17, 2018
Credit: Produced in association with Caltech Academic Media Technologies

For hundreds of years, most optical elements like lenses and polarizers have been fabricated using carefully polished pieces of glass or crystals and assembled in optical systems such as cameras and microscopes.

Delivering the Earnest C. Watson Lecture on January 17, Andrei Faraon (BS '04) will discuss how nanotechnology enables new ways to make optical components using fabrication processes already developed in the semiconductor industry. These nanopatterned structures, named optical metasurfaces, allow for extreme miniaturization of optical systems with applications in consumer electronics and medical devices.

Faraon is an assistant professor of applied physics, and his laboratory specializes in developing nanophotonic technologies for devices that operate close to the fundamental limit of light-matter interaction, with applications in imaging, sensing, and quantum information processing. In 2016, Faraon was named the inaugural KNI-Wheatley Scholar in Nanoscience, established by Chuck and Judith Wheatley and the Kavli Nanoscience Institute. He was also the recipient of the 2015 National Science Foundation CAREER award, the 2015 Air Force Office of Scientific Research Young Investigator Award, and the 2016 Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award.

The lecture, held at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, January 17, in Beckman Auditorium, is a free event; no tickets or reservations are required.


Named for the late Caltech professor Earnest C. Watson, who founded the series in 1922, the Watson Lectures present Caltech and JPL researchers describing their work to the public. Many past Watson Lectures are available online at Caltech's YouTube site.

[ + ]
Thu, 19 Oct 2017 17:32:03 +0000
The Grand Tour: Watson Lecture Preview
In the November 15 Watson Lecture, Professor of Planetary Science Heather Knutson will discuss how to characterize planets outside of our solar system.
News Writer: 
Lori Dajose
Heather Knutson
Heather Knutson
Credit: Caltech

The past decade has marked a period of great progress in our quest to discover and characterize the properties of the planets outside of our own solar system, called exoplanets. Observations of eclipsing systems—in which a planet periodically passes in front of and then behind its star as seen from Earth—have given us new insights into the nature of these alien worlds. On November 15, Professor of Planetary Science Heather Knutson will give a Watson Lecture to discuss ongoing efforts, using a combination of both ground- and space-based telescopes, to investigate the diverse properties of exoplanetary systems. This Watson Lecture begins at 8 p.m. in Beckman Auditorium and is free and open to the public.

What do you do?

I study the properties of planets orbiting nearby stars. We're currently very good at finding these systems—the astronomy community has found over 5,000 planets and planet candidates so far—but for the vast majority of them, all we know is the size and orbital period of the planet. My group is working to answer questions like: What is the planet made of? Does it have an atmosphere and, if so, what kind? What is the weather like on the planet—is it hot, cold, cloudy, windy?

Why is this important?

There are two reasons why this is important. First, we are looking for clues that tell us about how these planetary systems formed and evolved. Many of them have architectures that look very different than our own—for instance, a large gas giant planet orbiting closer to its star than Mercury is to our sun. We'd like to understand why our solar system went down a different path. The second reason is related to life: we'd like to know whether Earth-like planets are common or rare in the universe and eventually we'd like to search for signs of life on these planets. Of course, life might not necessarily be limited to Earth-like planets, but it's the obvious place to start!

How did you get into this line of work?

I have always loved science, and picked physics as my major when I was an undergrad at Johns Hopkins because it was interesting and also practical. However, my interests took a decidedly non-practical turn when I found my way across the street to the Space Telescope Science Institute, home of the Hubble Space Telescope, and located immediately adjacent to the Johns Hopkins campus, for a summer internship. The presence of so many professional astronomers in one spot convinced me that, yes, you could earn a living doing really cool astronomy research, and I ultimately ended up going to Harvard to earn my PhD in astronomy.

 

Named for the late Caltech professor Earnest C. Watson, who founded the series in 1922, the Watson Lectures present Caltech and JPL researchers describing their work to the public. Many past Watson Lectures are available online at Caltech's YouTube site.

[ + ]
Wed, 03 May 2017 21:53:08 +0000
Going Out in a Blaze of Glory: Cassini Mission Highlights
The November Watson Lecture will be given by Linda Spilker, Cassini project scientist.
News Writer: 
Lori Dajose
Linda Spilker

Early in the morning of September 15, the Cassini spacecraft sent its final signals to Earth and plunged into Saturn, burning up in its atmosphere. Cassini had been orbiting and observing the planet and its moons for the previous 13 years. On Wednesday, November 1, Cassini project scientist Linda Spilker of NASA's JPL, a division of Caltech, will give a Watson Lecture highlighting the Cassini mission's most intriguing discoveries. The lecture begins at 8 p.m. in Beckman Auditorium and is free to the public.

What do you do?

I am the Cassini project scientist. I am responsible for maximizing the scientific return of the mission within cost and schedule. I work with a team of over 300 international scientists to produce the best science possible for the mission across five diverse areas involving the planet, its magnetosphere, its rings, the moon Titan, and the icy satellites. I enjoy interacting with Cassini's scientists.

Why is this important?

By studying the planets, we seek to answer some key questions about ourselves, including how the solar system come to be and if we are alone in the universe. The discoveries made by Cassini and Huygens [a probe carried into space by Cassini that landed on Saturn's moon Titan in 2005] have certainly expanded the possibility that there are other worlds where life might exist. For example, Saturn's tiny moon Enceladus has a salty, liquid water ocean beneath its icy crust, as does the giant moon Titan. Could life exist inside these ocean worlds?

How did you get into this line of work?

I always enjoyed science, most especially studies of the stars and planets. My parents gave me my first telescope when I was nine years old. The first thing I did was to use it to look at Saturn, Jupiter, and their moons. I wondered what these worlds would look like up close. Working on both Cassini and Voyager gave me a chance to find out.

I majored in physics in college at Cal State Fullerton. When I got out of school in the late 1970s, it was a great time to look for a job. I applied at JPL—in fact, JPL was number one on my list as I had always wanted to do something in astronomy or on the planets. I was offered two jobs—one on the Viking extended mission, and one on a new mission called Voyager that hadn't even launched yet. I asked where Voyager was going. They said, "Jupiter and Saturn and, if all goes well, on to Uranus and Neptune." So of course I chose Voyager—that was a no-brainer. I was just launching my career and it seemed appropriate to start with something new. Using Voyager data, I got both master's and PhD degrees at UCLA. As Voyager was ending, I was asked to participate in a scientific study for a mission to return to Saturn. That mission ultimately became Cassini. Working on both Voyager and Cassini has been a dream come true.

 

Named for the late Caltech professor Earnest C. Watson, who founded the series in 1922, the Watson Lectures present Caltech and JPL researchers describing their work to the public. Many past Watson Lectures are available online at Caltech's YouTube site.

[ + ]
Tue, 18 Apr 2017 23:20:42 +0000
What Columbus Discovered
Nicolás Wey-Gómez will give the May 10 Watson Lecture about the voyages of Christopher Columbus.
News Writer: 
Lori Dajose
Nicolás Wey-Gómez
Credit: Caltech

For five centuries, the voyages of Christopher Columbus have inspired heated debate over the true nature of his Indies enterprise. Did Columbus believe he had reached Asia or a continent unknown to his European contemporaries? And what did he intend to accomplish once he crossed the Atlantic?

On May 10, Professor of History Nicolás Wey-Gómez will explore some of the facts and fiction surrounding Columbus's geographical surveys of the Bahamas and the Caribbean Basin. He will show how the navigator's discoveries revolutionized old ideas about the globe, and how science, faith, and politics shaped the momentous encounter between Europe and the Americas. Admission is free.

What do you do?

I study the early history of exploration and empires; in particular, the role that science and technology played in Portugal's and Spain's discovery of a vast world beyond Europe. During the 15th and 16th centuries, Iberia pioneered the exploration of the globe's lower latitudes, producing vast amounts of empirical information about the physical world. But this process also unleashed violence and exploitation on a global scale. My work on Columbus reinvents the geographical history of the discovery of America as part of Europe's problematic awakening to the natural and human resources of the tropics. It draws attention to the role that terrestrial latitude played in Columbus's exploration of the Caribbean, to the assumptions that informed his account of tropical latitudes, and to the political lessons that he and his contemporaries in Europe were willing to draw about America's native peoples.

Why is this important?

Just as the stars in our night sky, the current configuration of the continents, and the nature and distribution of animals and plants around the globe are the results of events and forces in the past, so too are contemporary human realities across our planet—including the unequal distribution of power and resources among the peoples of the earth—the result of events and forces in the past. Iberia's early ventures in Africa, the Caribbean Basin, and the Indian and Pacific oceans brought with them colonialism and slavery on a global scale. Iberian expansion also paved the way for modern racism, inequality, and nationalism—not to mention the great divide that in our own global age still exists between the so-called "developed" countries of the north and the "developing" countries of the south.

How did you get into this line of work?

It was not supposed to happen this way. I loved reading fiction as a kid, and I went to graduate school to study Hispanic literature. But I enrolled by chance in a class that changed me forever. We read eyewitness accounts of the discovery and conquest of the Americas. These stories moved me and gripped me in a way that fiction never had. This is how I came across Columbus. In time, I came to realize there were important questions about Columbus I simply could not answer as a literary scholar that I might be able to answer as a historian. Likewise, there were many questions I could not answer as a historian that I might be able to answer if only I learned something about science, technology, and other areas of human expertise in Columbus's time.

Named for the late Caltech professor Earnest C. Watson, who founded the series in 1922, the Watson Lectures present Caltech and JPL researchers describing their work to the public. Many past Watson Lectures are available online at Caltech's YouTube site.

[ + ]
Tue, 11 Apr 2017 16:56:01 +0000
Junior Watson Program Brings Top High School Science Students to Campus
News Writer: 
Jon Nalick
Garreth Ruane, a postdoctoral scholar in astronomy, shows visiting students from South Pasadena High School filtered views of the sun.
Using a telescope set up atop the Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Garreth Ruane (center), postdoctoral scholar in astronomy, shows visiting students from South Pasadena High School filtered views of the sun.
Credit: Caltech

From visiting an optics lab and peering through telescopes to dining at the Athenaeum and attending a lecture on exoplanets, eight students from South Pasadena High School recently got a glimpse of life at Caltech.

"I can feel everyone's passion and love for science. Caltech has a very energetic atmosphere," said junior Jane Yang. The tour "inspired me to explore more about fundamental science."

Yang and her classmates visited the campus on April 5 as part of the Junior Watson Program, which brings high school teachers and their AP science students to campus twice each year; during each of these visits, the students get to hear a lecture from the Earnest C. Watson Lecture Series, visit the featured researcher's lab, and learn more about Caltech.

During their recent visit, the South Pasadena students listened to a presentation on admissions criteria, financial aid, and the curriculum. Afterward, they trekked to the Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics to spend time in the lab of Dimitri Mawet, associate professor of astronomy, where they examined prototypes of optics designed to look at distant exoplanets; later, they climbed to the roof to view the sun and moon through a telescope. After dinner at the Athenaeum, the students filed into Beckman Auditorium to hear Mawet deliver his lecture on directly imaging planets outside of our solar system.

Sophomore Sarah Uriarte called the lecture "fascinating. … I didn't have previous knowledge about remote sensing, but I learned quite a bit about it and would love to learn more."

She said that the Junior Watson Program provided useful insight into STEM careers and research, and added that the visit increased her interest in attending Caltech. "It was a good experience—I had a really great time."

The Institute created the Junior Watson Program in 1998 as a collaboration between Public Events (now Campus Programs) and Admissions. The program will host its final group of students for this academic year on April 19, when students from STEM Academy of Boyle Heights will attend a lecture by Adam Wierman, professor of computing and mathematical sciences, on cloud computing.

[ + ]

How Clean is the Cloud?
Adam Wierman will give the April 19 Watson Lecture on sustainable cloud computing.
Adam Wierman
Adam Wierman
Credit: Caltech

Computing "in the cloud" may sound ephemeral, but the cloud actually has a physical presence in the form of data centers filled with thousands of servers. The power infrastructure needed to run these servers is enormous. In fact, at this point in time, data centers lead to more carbon emissions than the airline industry.

On Wednesday April 19, Adam Wierman, professor of computing and mathematical sciences (CMS) in the Division of Engineering and Applied Science, executive officer for CMS, and director of Information Science and Technology at Caltech, will give a Watson Lecture describing ongoing research at Caltech aimed at building a sustainable computing infrastructure. In this design, data centers are powered by renewable energy and even serve as virtual energy storage facilities for more broadly integrating renewable energy into the electrical grid. Admission is free.

What do you do?

In typical Caltech fashion, I'm kind of hard to categorize. I study problems at the intersection of cloud computing, energy, and markets. This covers a wide range of questions from "Can we make cloud computing sustainable?" to "Can we run the electricity grid reliably if we get more than half our energy from renewable generation?"

Why is this important?

One of the biggest societal challenges we face today is how we can move our energy usage away from fossil fuels and toward more sustainable sources. The climate crisis will fundamentally change our world in the coming decades. Making the move to a sustainable energy landscape is an enormous interdisciplinary challenge—one that requires not just new technologies, but a complete reimagining of the way we think about generating and delivering electricity. Computational thinking has been a huge disruptor for many industries, and now is the time for that disruption to come to our energy infrastructure. Between the "smart grid," distributed solar generation, electric vehicles, and distributed energy storage, we have an enormous opportunity to make an impact. But, it's not enough to plug these new technologies in and turn them on. We need to redesign the systems, architectures, and markets if we want our energy landscape to be sustainable.

How did you get into this line of work?

When I came to Caltech in 2007, I was a computer scientist through and through. That changed within the first year I was here. It began when I consciously made the decision to focus on energy for all the reasons I described above. But, at the same time, Caltech was unconsciously changing the way I thought, in another way. I started interacting with faculty from all over campus, learning from them, and being influenced by them. The economists, especially John Ledyard [Alan and Lenabelle Davis Professor of Economics and Social Sciences, Emeritus], began to rub off on me and within a year I was co-teaching an economics course—a topic I had never studied before coming to Caltech! Then, about a year later these two different paths merged, as I realized how crucial it was to deal with both the economic and engineering aspects of energy together. Now, combining these with my computer science background, I truly bridge all three areas.

 

Named for the late Caltech professor Earnest C. Watson, who founded the series in 1922, the Watson Lectures present Caltech and JPL researchers describing their work to the public. Many past Watson Lectures are available online at Caltech's YouTube site.

[ + ]
«Caltech.Edu»
Booking.com B.V. is based in Amsterdam in the Netherlands. Ready for some statistics? Our 1,534,024 properties, including 860,482 holiday rentals, are located in 123,105 destinations in 229 countries and territories, and are supported internationally by 198 offices in 70 countries.
2013 Copyright © Techhap.com Mobile version 2015 | PeterLife & company
Skimlinks helps publishers monetize editorial content through automated affiliate links for products. Affiliate programm.
Link at is mandatory if site materials are using fully or particulary.
Were treated to the site administrator, a cup of coffee *https://paypal.me/peterlife
Yandex.ru