Home All 2017 Popular Book Lists

Boccaccio Giovanni (2017 Most Popular Book Lists)

$5.93
1. The Decameron (Penguin Classics)
$9.99
2. The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio
$4.52
3. The Decameron (Signet Classics)
$10.99
4. Decameron (Everyman's Library)
$5.93
5. The Decameron (Oxford World's
$6.36
6. Life of Dante (Oneworld Classics)
$11.75
7. Famous Women (I Tatti Renaissance
8. Decamerone (Italian Edition)
$24.29
9. Decameron, Volume 1 (Italian Edition)
10. The Original Decameron of Giovanni
$27.11
11. Decameron (German Edition)
$6.39
12. La Fiammetta
 
13. TALES FROM THE DECAMERON OF GIOVANNI
$9.61
14. Decameron (Spanish Edition)
$9.99
15. The Decameron, Volume II
$24.45
16. The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio,
 
$62.00
17. Stories from the Decameron (The
$31.27
18. The Life Of Giovanni Boccaccio
 
$22.50
19. The Filostrato of Giovanni Boccaccio
$9.47
20. The Decameron (Volume 1)

2017 buy books shipping

1. The Decameron (Penguin Classics)
by Giovanni Boccaccio
Paperback: 1072 Pages (2003-04-29)
list price: US$15.00 -- used & new: US$5.93
(price subject to change: see )
Asin: 0140449302
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

*****
Translated with an Introduction and Notes by G. H. McWilliam ... Read more

Customer Reviews (34)

3-0 out of 5 stars All stories are similar
Overall not a bad book, but it suffered from too much repetition. Each story seemed quite similar to others, so over 100 tales it just didn't hold the interest that I would have hoped it would. It was also quite bawdy, which I don't particularly mind, but over 100 tales, it just got old. There's only so much of "he wants to nail her, she wants to nail him, he wants to nail 'em all, etc..." before its like enough already... I also couldn't help but feel that a lot of the characters were really stupid. I realize that many of the stories are just glorified anecdotes, and as such, some of the characters don't really get any fleshing out, but rather just seem to fill in the role of the story. Kind of like when you're telling a story and you just say "'this guy' went in to see his lawyer...". But even so, some of the situations that got contrived just made me shake my head that someone could be so dumb as to not see through it - 14th century mind or not... Anyway, decent book, if taken in moderation.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Decameron
The Decameron is in great condition. Accurate description, fast shipping, and no damage done to the book.

5-0 out of 5 stars Perfect Condition
This book arrived in perfect condition and I am in love with it! I wonderful addition to my library.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Renaissance Soap Opera!!!
I had to read this in college for a Literature class and absolutely loved it.Before reading it, I assumed that I wouldn't be able to relate to it or enjoy it because it was written in the 14th century, but I was pleasantly surprised.The themes of the various short stories would fit right in with anything found on television today.This book is still a part of my personal library to this day!!

by Kardia Williams

4-0 out of 5 stars buyin books
Back cover was torn, not a big deal. Would probably buy from this seller again ... Read more


2. The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio
by Giovanni Boccaccio
Paperback: 560 Pages (2010-07-06)
list price: US$9.99 -- used & new: US$9.99
(price subject to change: see )
Asin: B003YL4D64
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

*****
The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio is presented here in a high quality paperback edition. This popular classic work by Giovanni Boccaccio is in the English language. If you enjoy the works of Giovanni Boccaccio then we highly recommend this publication for your book collection. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (6)

5-0 out of 5 stars Favorite Book of All Time
It's amazing to me how entertaining and relevant these stories still are.I've read this book 3 times since originally reading it as part of a college class.It's wonderful to pick up and read just one or two stories or read from cover to cover.

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

5-0 out of 5 stars It's Boccaccio, of course it is good
Of all Kindle editions, this is the best.Between format and translation, I am flying through this book.

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.
... Read more


3. The Decameron (Signet Classics)
by Giovanni Boccaccio
Paperback: 848 Pages (2002-12-03)
list price: US$8.95 -- used & new: US$4.52
(price subject to change: see )
Asin: 0451528662
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

*****
Set against the background of the Black Death of 1348, the hundred linked tales in Boccaccio's masterpiece are peopled by nobles, knights, nuns, doctors, lawyers, students, artists, peasants, pilgrims, servants, spendthrifts, thieves, gamblers, police-and lovers, both faithful and faithless. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (11)

5-0 out of 5 stars A realistic masterpiece!
The"Decameron" is a collection of 100 short stories written by the Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio between 1350 and 1353.
It's about a a group of seven young women and three young men who flee Florence during the plague and end up living together in a villa in Fiesole for two weeks. To pass the time, each person tells a story to the others in the group. In this manner 100 stories are told which revolve around different amorous episodes, the lust and greed of the clergy and the adventures of a few merchants. The author elevates different moral values like the power of intelligence, quick wit, ethics and good manners and takes up different social behaviors like the tricks that women play on men or that people play one each other.
The book is realistic, historical, philosophical, satirical and human.

Joyce Akesson, author of Love's Thrilling Dimensions and The Invitation

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

5-0 out of 5 stars excellent translation
I've tried to read these stories several times before but this is by far the best translation I've found yet.Very adult reading but passes for educational and is a great summer read!

5-0 out of 5 stars A suprisingly easy read
Funny, extremely entertaining, which is kind of shocking for medieval literature. I read the whole book in just 12 hours while sitting in the airport. It was the fattest book in the shop - great value for money. ... Read more


4. Decameron (Everyman's Library)
by Giovanni Boccaccio
Hardcover: 696 Pages (2009-09-01)
list price: US$27.00 -- used & new: US$10.99
(price subject to change: see )
Asin: 0307271714
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

*****
A brilliant new translation of the work that Herman Hesse called “the first great masterpiece of European storytelling.”

In the summer of 1348, with the plague ravaging Florence, ten young men and women take refuge in the countryside, where they entertain themselves with tales of love, death, and corruption, featuring a host of characters, from lascivious clergymen and mad kings to devious lovers and false miracle-makers. Named after the Greek for “ten days,” Boccaccio’s book of stories draws on ancient mythology, contemporary history, and everyday life, and has influenced the work of myriad writers who came after him.

J. G. Nichols’s new translation, faithful to the original but rendered in eminently readable modern English, captures the timeless humor of one of the great classics of European literature. ... Read more


5. The Decameron (Oxford World's Classics)
by Giovanni Boccaccio
Paperback: 752 Pages (2008-07-15)
list price: US$13.95 -- used & new: US$5.93
(price subject to change: see )
Asin: 0199540411
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

*****
For many centuries, Aristotle's Physics was theessential starting point for anyone who wished to studythe natural sciences.Now, in the first translationinto English since 1930, Aristotle's thought ispresented accurately, with a lucid introduction andextensive notes to explain the general structure of eacsection of the book, and shed light on particularproblems. It simplifies and expands the style of theoriginal, making for easier reading and bettercomprehension. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

3-0 out of 5 stars The Decameron (Oxford World's Classics)
This is an easy to read book and, undoubtedly, has been well translated.I read the Canterbury Tales from the same series and enjoyed it more.These tales, like those in the Canterbury tales, are earthy and funny.But they tend to be variations on the same theme(marital infidelity) and, after the first 50 tales, you get tired.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Edition to Get
This edition of the Decameron is accurate, uncensored and filled with fascinating footnotes.After having read The Canterbury Tales, I was looking for its companion piece and this is the definitive edition. This gives a real feel for medieval life and is humorous, bawdy and an entertaining read as well. ... Read more


6. Life of Dante (Oneworld Classics)
by Giovanni Boccaccio
Paperback: 128 Pages (2009-10-01)
list price: US$12.95 -- used & new: US$6.36
(price subject to change: see )
Asin: 1847490913
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

*****

Leonardo Bruni’s Life of Dante, extracts from Giovanni Villani’s Florentine Chronicles and Filippo Villani’s Life of Dante, as well as documents preserved in a manuscript of Boccaccio are combined in this impressive volume, and together they provide a wealth of insight and information into Dante’s unique character and life. They address the author’s susceptibility to the torments of passionate love, his involvement in politics, his scholastic enthusiasms, military experience, and the stories behind the greatest heights of his poetic achievements. Not only are these accounts invaluable for their subject matter, they are also seminal examples of early biographical writing. Also included in this expansive collection is a biography of Boccaccio himself.

... Read more

Customer Reviews (4)

4-0 out of 5 stars Interesting for multiple reasons
This book probably couldn't be labeled as overly entertaining, but it is very interesting. For one thing, it's the very first biography of Dante. Even more importantly, it's written by Giovanni Boccaccio, one of the great luminaries of Italian literature. As far as I know, no other biography written by one literary genius about another exists.

I was pleased to find a lot of material and anecdotes in it that I had also found in modern biographies. I also enjoyed reading firsthand the adoration that Dante's people poured upon him so soon after "The Divine Comedy" was written.

There are a few things in the book that might surprise modern readers. The supposed unhappiness of Dante's marriage is talked about for quite some time, despite Boccaccio acknowledging that he has no evidence of marital troubles besides his (Boccaccio's) own personal misogyny. Also, medieval literary theory and Boccaccio's opinions on literature sidetrack the narrative a bit, but that is simply how biographies were written at the time.

The only thing I don't like and can't explain is why the publishers included a story from "The Decameron" at the end of the book. The tale isn't about Dante and does not add to the biography.

5-0 out of 5 stars When a son of Florence writes about another son of Florence
"The Life of Dante", by Giovanni Boccaccio, is aptly described in the introduction by J.G. Nichols, at the beginning of this edition, as the "first modern literary biography", which is true, to some extent. Yet, in a time when a string of biographies written on more or less famous people seems to have, as only purpose, the crude expositions of mildly interesting (if at all) juicy tidbits, and this usually in a poor prose, this book, written in the 14th century by the author of the "Decameron", is at the same time light-hearted, poetic and informative. It gives us not only an insight into Dante's life, work and personality, but also into that of Boccaccio (and his infamous aversion to marriage, at least to that of the 'philosophers') and into the Florence both knew.

But most important and touching I think is the honest love for Dante's works and admiration for the man that are on display in every page, even when Boccaccio addresses Dante's faults. And of course, the style of the Florentine, one of the great writers behind the foundation of the Italian literature, only adds to the interest of this biography. A very refreshing reading, and a must for those of you who are at least curious about one of the major masterpieces of European literature and the man behind it.

5-0 out of 5 stars One literary master on another
Invaluable to anyone interested in Italian literature, Dante or Boccaccio. Boccaccio, of course was a great admirer of Dante's, wrote a commentary on the Divine Comedy and was greatly influenced by him. Writing at a time when Dante was not given the respect he has since (surely inevitably) gained, Boccaccio wrote this biography of him, pointing out his great merits as a person, poet, and political figure. It's fascinating to see the results, with insights on every page into both Dante, Boccaccio, and also Florentine society of the time. There are wonderful stories about Dante to illustrate his peculiarities as a man - I particularly enjoyed the story of him vandalising a workman's tools for misquoting the Comedy. Highly recommended.

5-0 out of 5 stars Bio the way it was ment to be
More than a simple biography, Boccaccio's The Life of Dante is an ode to a master by his pupil.Not only does the book tell the tale of Dante's life, it illustrates nicely Italian life and politics.The biography is short and fast paced.The reader can actually feel the author's love of his subject seeping off the pages. ... Read more


7. Famous Women (I Tatti Renaissance Library, 1)
by Giovanni Boccaccio
Paperback: 320 Pages (2003-04-30)
list price: US$16.95 -- used & new: US$11.75
(price subject to change: see )
Asin: 0674011309
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

*****
The more than 100 women whose life stories make up this volume range from the exemplary to the notorious, from historical and mythological figures to Renaissance contemporaries of its author, the master storyteller Giovanni Boccaccio. The first collection of biographies in Western literature devoted exclusively to women, Famous Women affords a fascinating glimpse of a moment in history when medieval attitudes toward women were beginning to give way to more modern views of their potential. Virginia Brown's acclaimed translation, commissioned for The I Tatti Renaissance Library, is the first English edition based on the autograph manuscript of the Latin. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (6)

2-0 out of 5 stars No Second Decameron
What a disappointment this will be for all those who enjoyed Boccaccio's Decameron and were looking forward to more of the same ilk!

Legend tells us that Boccaccio, in old age, underwent a kind of religious conversion that led him to denounce the writings for which we admire him.A perusal of his "Famous Women" will convince you of the sad truth of that legend.Gone are the bawdry, the deliciously pointed humor, the sheer merriment and zest for life, the tolerance for (and enjoyment of) human frailty.In their place we find a caricature of the type of person Boccaccio had such fun with in his better days.The author of these synopses has become a dreary moralist, soured and bitter, puritanical, and almost fanatical in his fear and distrust of Woman.

The only women he can now admire may be divided into two categories:(l) the Amazonian warrior-queen type with masculine notions of Honor, Duty and Courage, and the will to carry out such values in endless bloodletting and carnage; and (2) the defenders of their own honor--or that of their husbands--in grand, suicidal acts--running into swords, leaping onto funeral pyres (Dido) or swallowing fire (Portia).Lucretia's suicide was, of course, the only honorable thing to do when one has suffered rape.And the very noblest thing a woman can do is lay down her life for her husband, regardless of how undeserving or unloving he may be.

Boccaccio's women are castigated for such pleasant pastimes as dancing, play-going, and the decoration of their bodies.Female lust is assumed to be rampant, and any expression of it, even in lawful marriage, is lamented.In one instance, the guardians of young girls are advised to consider shutting them up in nunneries where they can do no harm!.

One very interesting theory does emerge from these pages, and that is in the author's assumption that the gods and demi-gods of Greek and Roman mythology were once actual humans with unusual achievements whose actual exploits became embroidered over
time... Aside from that, its only value is as a literary curiosity.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great edition of a wonderful early Renaissance work
Boccaccio's De Claribus Mulieribus (Of Famous Women) is a wonderful compendium of 100 classical and medieval stories about pagan women (and six about Christian women).you can read about Amazons, courtesans, chaste wives and teacherous ones, Queens and poets. Virginia Brown's translation is excellent, and it is invaluable to have the Latin text on facing pages. (Note: only the hardback edition has the Latin).

5-0 out of 5 stars Boccaccio's De mulieribus claris
(some reviewers have noted that their edition did not include the Latin text - the hardcover has both Latin and English and the soft cover contains only the English translation)

Giovanni Boccaccio's De mulieribus claris was the first collection of biographies in Western literature "devoted exclusively to women". Boccaccio (1313-1375) dedicated it to Andrea Acciaiuoli, Countess of Atlavilla, a Tuscan noblewoman.This work was inspired by Petrarch's De viris illustribus.Boccaccio sought to record to posterity the stories of women who were virtuous and did good deeds.However, he includes both good and bad models for women.Boccaccio hoped that by including both models, his work will function as a "spur to virtue and a curb on vice." Boccaccio primarily selects pagan women of Greco-Roman antiquity.He excluded Christian women since they were celebrated in hagiographic literature.Secondly, pagan women who where not inspired by Christian virtue achieved "achieved earthly fame with the help of gifts and instincts they had received from Nature," or through the desire for glory.He believed that even these examples should be emulated by Christian women.

Some of the most interesting chapters in my opinion pertain to women connected to Nero and his reign.Chapter XCII concerns the life of Agrippina, mother of the monstrous Nero.Chapter XCII, tells the tale of Epicharis, a freedwoman, who joined the conspiracy against Nero and committed suicide rather than give the names of the conspirators.Chapter XCIV, recounts how Pompea Paulina wife of Seneca, Nero's tutor, tried to commit suicide with her husband but was rescued by Nero at the last moment.And lastly, Chapter XCV tells the legend of Sabina Poppea, the scheming wife of Nero, who dies ignominiously after being kicked by her husband while pregnant.Some other interesting women in the text include Lesbia, Minerva, and various Queens (Dido, Jacosta, etc).

Boccaccio stresses that women should be learned, loyal, and virtuous.He digresses lengthily on the virtues of Roman conception of marriage and laments how women in his time get married more than once.Likewise, he warns against lust and excessive scheming.Each chapter follows a similar structure.First, he begins with the name of the woman, her parentage, and her rank.Then, an explanation of her fame with allusions to historians and other authorities.Each ends concludes with an often lengthy moralizing precept.

This is an absolutely fascinating text.Often Boccaccio's Decameron overshadows his lesser known works.He also wrote a similar history of famous men which sadly does not have an English translation (an Italian edition exists in print).Virginia Brown provides a wonderful introduction, a source list for each chapter, and a truly beautiful translation which is a joy to read.It is fascinating comparing Boccaccio's account of famous women with Christine de Pizan's The Book of the City of Ladies (considered the first feminist history).A must buy for the lay person and Medieval/Renaissance historian alike.

1-0 out of 5 stars Not the book shown in the "Look Inside"
This paperback edition does *NOT* include side-by-side English-Latin as indicated in the images. Very disappointing. Amazon should make sure they are picturing the proper product on their site. The cover image is correct, but that's it. *Do not* purchase this item if you are looking for English-Latin. I am going to cross my fingers and purchase the hardcover in hopes that it might be accurately represented.

5-0 out of 5 stars Entertaining, middle age reading
This book was awesome and entertaining.It was easy reading.Reading this book I wondered how much was true and how much was based on myth.If these lives were all true, then history should be renamed herstory! ... Read more


8. Decamerone (Italian Edition)
by Giovanni Boccaccio
Kindle Edition: Pages (2010-05-18)
list price: US$0.99
Asin: B003N2QV14
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Editorial Review

*****
Il Decamerone è una raccolta di cento novelle scritta nel Trecento (probabilmente tra il 1349 ed il 1351) da Giovanni Boccaccio.
Il libro narra di un gruppo di giovani, sette donne e tre uomini, che trattenendosi fuori città per dieci giorni, per sfuggire alla peste nera che imperversava in quel periodo a Firenze, raccontano a turno delle novelle di taglio spesso umoristico e con frequenti richiami all'erotismo bucolico del tempo. Per quest'ultimo aspetto, il libro fu tacciato di immoralità o di scandalo, e fu in molte epoche censurato o comunque non adeguatamente considerato nella storia della letteratura.
È considerata, nel contesto del Trecento europeo, una delle opere più importanti della letteratura, fondatrice della letteratura in prosa in volgare italiano. Ebbe larghissima influenza non solo nella letteratura italiana ed europea (si pensi solo ai Canterbury Tales di Geoffrey Chaucer), ma anche nelle lettere future, ispirando l'ideale di vita edonistica e dedicata al piacere ed al culto del viver sereno tipici della cultura umanista e rinascimentale.

The "Decamerone" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353. It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.
The Decamerone is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale. The Decameron played a part in the history of the novel and was finished by Giovanni Boccaccio in 1351. This work opens with a description of the Bubonic Plague (Black Death) and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who fled from Plague ridden Florence for a villa outside of the city walls. To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for every one of the ten nights spent at the villa. The Decamerone is a distinctive work, in that it describes in detail the physical, psychological and social effects that the Bubonic Plague had on that part of Europe. It is also interesting to note that a number of the stories contained within the Decameron would later appear in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. ... Read more


9. Decameron, Volume 1 (Italian Edition)
by Giovanni Boccaccio
Paperback: 580 Pages (2010-02-24)
list price: US$43.75 -- used & new: US$24.29
(price subject to change: see )
Asin: 1145785093
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

*****
This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words.This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (5)

1-0 out of 5 stars Kindle customers beware!
Amazon has linked this book to the page for Penguin's edition of The Decameron translated by G.H. McWilliam. After careful shopping for the "right translation," I ended up purchasing McWilliams'. And the more I read it the happier I am with my choice. When I saw that the book was also available for my Kindle I impulsively downloaded it. WARNING: This is NOT the McWilliam's translation (it seems to be a very old, public domain text); nor does it include McWilliams' excellent and conprehensive introduction.

My advice to Kindle customers: When buying classic literature in translation for downloading, always order a free sample first so you be sure it's the translation you want.

4-0 out of 5 stars Entertaining Audio Book
This review is for the unabridged Blackstone audio book narrated by Frederick Davidson.I have a rather long commute, so I pass the time listening to audio books and I have been working my way through several of the classics.I saw that the Decameron was available and that it had good reviews so I gave it a shot.It turned out to be a very enjoyable listening experience.

The reader has a very appropriate voice for this book.He does a good job changing his voice to match the different characters.The translation is somewhat archaic and was initially hard to follow until I got used to the terms.I actually got to enjoy some of the terms after awhile.For example, when addressing the women in the storytelling group, the men would call them `lovesome ladies'.

The 100 stories in the Decameron were delightful.They were told in groups of ten, with a theme for each.Some were very bawdy, and I'm hoping adultery wasn't as common of a practice in the 14th century as indicated.I recognized many of the storylines in movies I have seen or books I have read.It's amazing how much creativity one man can generate.The stories occurred mostly in Italy, but covered much of Europe and the Muslim world as well.Boccaccio clearly used his satire to skewer the hypocritical churchmen of his time.It was very interesting to see what the world was like in those days.

This is clearly a classic that deserves to be read.The audio book was also very good, but be aware that it may take the first hour or two to get used to the archaic language.After the adjustment, it turns out to be a gem.

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

5-0 out of 5 stars life is life
as i approached boccaccio`s decameron i was forced not to to stop reading it and though it`s language was rather hard giovvanni`s strange ability of putting words together made me comprehend every single part of it.ten young people chose to escape the devastating plague by going into a solitary house a little away from florence.in order to avoid burdom they all agreed that each one of them to tell a story each day .boccaccio used such stories to depict the absurdities and moral corruption of the many people living . all in all the gift of poety and literature that he has enabled his story to be very amusing , he could serve his aim through the bookby using a light comic style which made it interesting to whoever reads it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Essential book for any High School Student.
The Decameron is a book which is so diverse and full of information, style, insight, that it is an esstial novel for the high school english student to read.It is saterical and entertaining, I found it hard to put down.When i was taking English class in high school I found that the Decameron gave me a base for all that I learned in class.I used it for examples, references, as well as a source of information which gave me an idea on what people were like during that time periodof history.I also found that I helped me endlessly when my class revieved The Canterbury Tails, which based most or all it's tails on the Decameron. ... Read more


10. The Original Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio
by Giovanni Boccaccio
Kindle Edition: Pages (2010-04-05)
list price: US$4.00
Asin: B003FMUYCO
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

11. Decameron (German Edition)
by Giovanni Boccaccio, Adelbert Von Keller, Heinrich Steinhöwel
Paperback: 708 Pages (2010-02-13)
list price: US$49.75 -- used & new: US$27.11
(price subject to change: see )
Asin: 114444330X
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

*****
This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words.This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.
... Read more


12. La Fiammetta
by Giovanni Boccaccio
Paperback: 26 Pages (2010-07-24)
list price: US$6.40 -- used & new: US$6.39
(price subject to change: see )
Asin: 1443205494
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Editorial Review

*****
The book has no illustrations or index. Purchasers are entitled to a free trial membership in the General Books Club where they can select from more than a million books without charge. Subjects: Fiction / Romance / General; Fiction / Classics; Fiction / Classics; ... Read more


13. TALES FROM THE DECAMERON OF GIOVANNI BOCACCIO
by GIOVANNI BOCCACCIO
 Hardcover: Pages (1930-01-01)

Asin: B000K09H7C
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.
... Read more


14. Decameron (Spanish Edition)
by Giovanni Boccaccio
Paperback: 174 Pages (2005-05-15)
list price: US$12.80 -- used & new: US$9.61
(price subject to change: see )
Asin: 9707320729
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

*****
Esta obra fue la precursora del renacimiento italiano. Escrita en lengua vernacula, consagro a su autor como el representante y difusor de la prosa hablada por el vulgo toscano. En el Decameron, los humanos se desnudan en todos los sentidos, mostrando al lector el catalogo de imperfecciones interiores que dan, en cierta manera, sentido a su existencia: celos, envidia, traiciones, sexo, nada permanece oculto a la incisiva mirada de Boccaccio. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.
... Read more


15. The Decameron, Volume II
by Giovanni Boccaccio
Paperback: 244 Pages (2010-07-12)
list price: US$9.99 -- used & new: US$9.99
(price subject to change: see )
Asin: B003VQRPV2
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

*****
The Decameron, Volume II is presented here in a high quality paperback edition. This popular classic work by Giovanni Boccaccio is in the English language. If you enjoy the works of Giovanni Boccaccio then we highly recommend this publication for your book collection. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.
... Read more


16. The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio, Volume 1
by Giovanni Boccaccio
Paperback: 448 Pages (2008-02-14)
list price: US$35.75 -- used & new: US$24.45
(price subject to change: see )
Asin: 1437524621
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Editorial Review

*****
Translated by John Payne ... Read more


17. Stories from the Decameron (The Collected stories of the world's greatest writers)
by Giovanni Boccaccio
 Leather Bound: 644 Pages (1977)
-- used & new: US$62.00
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Asin: B0006CUUPM
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18. The Life Of Giovanni Boccaccio
by Thomas Caldecot Chubb
Hardcover: 312 Pages (2008-06-13)
list price: US$45.95 -- used & new: US$31.27
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Asin: 1436685524
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*****
Kessinger Publishing is the place to find hundreds of thousands of rare and hard-to-find books with something of interest for everyone! ... Read more


19. The Filostrato of Giovanni Boccaccio
by Giovanni Boccaccio
 Paperback: Pages (1998-06)
list price: US$25.00 -- used & new: US$22.50
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Asin: 081960187X
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20. The Decameron (Volume 1)
by Giovanni Boccaccio
Paperback: 212 Pages (2010-01-04)
list price: US$9.47 -- used & new: US$9.47
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Asin: 1152020277
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
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*****
Volume: 1Publisher: London : Privately printedNotes: This is an OCR reprint. There may be typos or missing text. There are no illustrations or indexes.When you buy the General Books edition of this book you get free trial access to Million-Books.com where you can select from more than a million books for free. You can also preview the book there. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.
... Read more


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