Journal Sciences News
Biochemical and Molecular Medicine
July 2018
Editorial Board and Contents
Publication date: July 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 7

July 2018
Unbuttoning the Ancestral Flower of Angiosperms
Publication date: July 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 7 Author(s): Orlando C. De-Paula, Leandro C.S. Assis, Louis P. Ronse de Craene A recent study using an extensive data set plus sophisticated analytical tools reconstructed a model of the ancestral angiosperm flower. Although attractive, it presents problems of homology assessment. We discuss its inconsistencies and endorse the use of a comparative model that integrates biological parameters as essential to elucidate floral evolution.
July 2018
Conserved Degradation of Orthologous RLCKs Regulates Immune Homeostasis
Publication date: July 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 7 Author(s): Jacqueline Monaghan Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AtBIK1 and rice (Oryza sativa) OsRLCK176 are orthologous receptor-like cytoplasmic kinases involved in immune signaling. Recent studies indicate that proteasomal turnover of these kinases is regulated by orthologous Ca2+-dependent protein kinases AtCPK28 and OsCPK4, revealing conserved interplay between phosphorylation and ubiquitination in immune homeostasis.
July 2018
New Components of the Lignin Biosynthetic Metabolon
Publication date: July 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 7 Author(s): Juan Du, Yang Zhang, Qiao Zhao Lignin biosynthetic enzymes form a complex on the ER. Here we highlight how the recent identification of the membrane steroid binding proteins (MSBPs) as the structural component of the complex have revealed the molecular mechanism underlying the monolignol metabolon formation.
July 2018
Roles of Plant-Associated Microbiota in Traditional Herbal Medicine
Publication date: July 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 7 Author(s): Weijuan Huang, Chunlin Long, Eric Lam The microbiome of medicinal plants may directly impact the metabolome of the host, and thus could influence the efficacy of herbal medicine. We advocate a herb for traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), Salvia miltiorrhiza, as a prime model system to study how microbes may interact with medicinal plants to modify phytochemical production.
July 2018
Array of MADS-Box Genes: Facilitator for Rapid Adaptation?
Publication date: July 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 7 Author(s): G
July 2018
Non-Mycorrhizal Plants: The Exceptions that Prove the Rule
Publication date: July 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 7 Author(s): Marco Cosme, Ivan Fern
July 2018
Alternative Oxidase Is Positive for Plant Performance
Publication date: July 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 7 Author(s): Jennifer Selinski, Renate Scheibe, David A. Day, James Whelan The alternative pathway of mitochondrial electron transport, which terminates in the alternative oxidase (AOX), uncouples oxidation of substrate from mitochondrial ATP production, yet plant performance is improved under adverse growth conditions. AOX is regulated at different levels. Identification of regulatory transcription factors shows that Arabidopsis thaliana AOX1a is under strong transcriptional suppression. At the protein level, the primary structure is not optimised for activity. Maximal activity requires the presence of various metabolites, such as tricarboxylic acid-cycle intermediates that act in an isoform-specific manner. In this opinion article we propose that the regulatory mechanisms that keep AOX activity suppressed, at both the gene and protein level, are positive for plant performance due to the flexible short- and long-term fine-tuning.
July 2018
Entering the Next Dimension: Plant Genomes in 3D
Publication date: July 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 7 Author(s): Mariana Sotelo-Silveira, Ricardo A. Ch
July 2018
Many Shades of Grey in BotrytisHost Plant Interactions
Publication date: July 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 7 Author(s): Javier Veloso, Jan A.L. van Kan The grey mould Botrytis cinerea causes disease in more than 1000 plant species, including important crops. The interaction between Botrytis and its (potential) hosts is determined by quantitative susceptibility and virulence traits in both interacting partners, resulting in a greyscale of disease outcomes. Fungal infection was long thought to rely mainly on its capacity to kill the host plant and degrade plant tissue. Recent research has revealed that Botrytis exploits two crucial biological processes in host plants for its own success. We highlight recent findings that illustrate that the interactions between Botrytis and its host plants are subtle and we discuss the molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling the many shades of grey during these interactions.
July 2018
Molecular Regulation of CBF Signaling in Cold Acclimation
Publication date: July 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 7 Author(s): Yiting Shi, Yanglin Ding, Shuhua Yang Cold stress restricts plant growth, development, and distribution. Understanding how plants transduce and respond to cold signals has long been a topic of interest. Traditional genetic and molecular analyses have identified C-repeat/DREB binding factors (CBFs) as key transcription factors that function in cold acclimation. Recent studies revealed the involvement of pivotal protein kinases and transcription factors in CBF-dependent signaling, expanding our knowledge of cold signal transduction from perception to downstream gene expression events. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the molecular regulation of these core components of the CBF cold signaling pathway. Knowledge of the mechanism underlying the ability of plants to survive freezing temperatures will facilitate the development of crop plants with increased freezing tolerance.
Available online 21 June 2018
Assessing Flux Distribution Associated with Metabolic Specialization of Glandular Trichomes
Publication date: July 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 7 Author(s): Jordan J. Zager, B. Markus Lange Many aromatic plants accumulate mixtures of secondary (or specialized) metabolites in anatomical structures called glandular trichomes (GTs). Different GT types may also synthesize different mixtures of secreted metabolites, and this contributes to the enormous chemical diversity reported to occur across species. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in characterizing the genes and enzymes that are responsible for the unique metabolic capabilities of GTs in different lineages of flowering plants. Less is known about the processes that regulate flux distribution through precursor pathways toward metabolic end-products. We discuss here the results from a meta-analysis of genome-scale models that were developed to capture the unique metabolic capabilities of different GT types.
Available online 19 June 2018
Discriminating the Function(s) of Guard Cell ALMT Channels
Publication date: Available online 21 June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science Author(s): David B. Medeiros, Alisdair R. Fernie, Wagner L. Ara
Available online 18 June 2018
Unraveling Interfaces between Energy Metabolism and Cell Cycle in Plants
Publication date: Available online 19 June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science Author(s): Jo
Available online 18 June 2018
Mixotrophy in Land Plants: Why To Stay Green?
Publication date: Available online 18 June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science Author(s): Jakub T
Available online 15 June 2018
Autophagosome Biogenesis and the Endoplasmic Reticulum: A Plant Perspective
Publication date: Available online 18 June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science Author(s): Xiaohong Zhuang, Kin Pan Chung, Mengqian Luo, Liwen Jiang The autophagosome is a double-membrane compartment formed during autophagy that sequesters and delivers cargoes for their degradation or recycling into the vacuole. Analyses of the AuTophaGy-related (ATG) proteins have unveiled dynamic mechanisms for autophagosome biogenesis. Recent advances in plant autophagy research highlight a complex interplay between autophagosome biogenesis and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER): on the one hand ER serves as a membrane source for autophagosome initiation and a signaling platform for autophagy regulation; on the other hand ER turnover is connected to selective autophagy. We provide here an integrated view of ER-based autophagosome biogenesis in plants in comparison with the newest findings in yeast and mammals, with an emphasis on the hierarchy of the core ATG proteins, ATG9 trafficking, and ER-resident regulators in autophagy.
Available online 7 June 2018
Out of Shape During Stress: A Key Role for Auxin
Publication date: Available online 15 June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science Author(s): Ruud A. Korver, Iko T. Koevoets, Christa Testerink In most abiotic stress conditions, including salinity and water deficit, the developmental plasticity of the plant root is regulated by the phytohormone auxin. Changes in auxin concentration are often attributed to changes in shoot-derived long-distance auxin flow. However, recent evidence suggests important contributions by short-distance auxin transport from local storage and local auxin biosynthesis, conjugation, and oxidation during abiotic stress. We discuss here current knowledge on long-distance auxin transport in stress responses, and subsequently debate how short-distance auxin transport and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) metabolism play a role in influencing eventual auxin accumulation and signaling patterns. Our analysis stresses the importance of considering all these components together and highlights the use of mathematical modeling for predictions of plant physiological responses.
Available online 7 June 2018
Plant NLR Origins Traced Back to Green Algae
Publication date: Available online 7 June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science Author(s): Diana Ortiz, Peter N. Dodds Innate immunity in land plants mostly relies on a repertoire of NLR (nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat) receptors. Gao et al. show that evolutionary assembly of the core building blocks of NLRs occurred in the ancestors of early plants and trace the diversification of NLR subclasses in green algae and mosses.
Available online 4 June 2018
Mechanisms of Photodamage and Protein Turnover in Photoinhibition
Publication date: Available online 7 June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science Author(s): Lei Li, Eva-Mari Aro, A. Harvey Millar Rapid protein degradation and replacement is an important response to photodamage and a means of photoprotection by recovering proteostasis. Protein turnover and translation efficiency studies have discovered fast turnover subunits in cytochrome b6f and the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH) complex, in addition to PSII subunit D1. Mutations of these complexes have been linked to enhanced photodamage at least partially via cyclic electron flow. Photodamage and photoprotection involving cytochrome b6f, NDH complex, cyclic electron flow, PSI, and nonphotochemical quenching proteins have been reported. Here, we propose that the rapid turnover of specific proteins in cytochrome b6f and the NDH complex need to be characterised and compared with the inhibition of PSII by excess excitation energy and PSI by excess electron flux to expand our understanding of photoinhibition mechanisms.
June 2018
iPSCs: A Comparison between Animals and Plants
Publication date: Available online 4 June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science Author(s): Ya Lin Sang, Zhi Juan Cheng, Xian Sheng Zhang Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are self-renewable cells with the potential to differentiate into all the cell types within an organism. PSCs exist transiently in early-stage mammalian embryos during ontogeny and are maintained in apical meristems of higher plants throughout postembryonic development. Through proper in vitro culture, somatic cells of both mammals and plants can be reprogrammed to generate induced PSCs (iPSCs). Recent studies have deciphered mechanisms underlying pluripotency gene activation and cell fate transition during plant iPSC generation. Here, we compare these mechanisms with those of their animal counterparts in the hope that this may trigger mutual learning of researchers from both fields, leading to advances and independent breakthroughs in this important area.
June 2018
Editorial Board and Contents
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 6

June 2018
Embracing Community Ecology in Plant Microbiome Research
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 6 Author(s): Francisco Dini-Andreote, Jos M. Raaijmakers Community assembly is mediated by selection, dispersal, drift, and speciation. Environmental selection is mostly used to date to explain patterns in plant microbiome assembly, whereas the influence of the other processes remains largely elusive. Recent studies highlight that adopting community ecology concepts provides a mechanistic framework for plant microbiome research.
June 2018
NPR1 in JazzSet with Pathogen Effectors
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 6 Author(s): Yali Sun, Thomas Ward Detchemendy, Karolina Marta Pajerowska-Mukhtar, M. Shahid Mukhtar NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES 1 (NPR1) is a master regulator of salicylic acid (SA)-mediated systemic acquired resistance (SAR), a broad-spectrum disease resistance mechanism in plants. NPR1 controls approximately 90% of SA-dependent transcriptome in Arabidopsis. Here, we discuss how pathogen effectors manipulate NPR1 functions in different cellular compartments to establish disease.
June 2018
The Plant Target of Rapamycin Kinase: A connecTOR between Sulfur and Growth
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 6 Author(s): C
June 2018
The Dual Face of Cyclin B1
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 6 Author(s): Arp Schnittger, Lieven De Veylder Although widely used as a marker for cell proliferation, CYCB1;1 expression is also strongly induced in cells that suffer from DNA damage. Recently, this enigmatic dual expression pattern has been resolved by proving that CYCB1;1 promotes DNA repair. This has consequences for using CYCB1;1 as a cell cycle reporter.
June 2018
How Does pH Fit in with Oscillating Polar Growth?
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 6 Author(s): Silvina Mangano, Javier Mart
June 2018
Recruitment of IC-WOX Genes in Root Evolution
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 6 Author(s): Wu Liu, Lin Xu Root evolution has resulted in the extant bifurcating roots in lycophytes, adventitious/lateral roots in euphyllophytes (ferns and seed plants), and primary roots in seed plants. Here, we hypothesize a role for intermediate-clade-WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX (IC-WOX) genes in root evolution. IC-WOX might not be specifically involved in lycophyte bifurcation rooting. In the fern Ceratopteris richardii, IC-WOX is expressed in adventitious/lateral root founder cells. In the seed plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there are two IC-WOX subclades, AtWOX11/12 and AtWOX8/9, in adventitious and primary root founder cells, respectively. Thus, IC-WOX was recruited in the common ancestor of ferns and seed plants for adventitious/lateral root organogenesis and evolved into two subclades in seed plants: one was retained in adventitious root organogenesis, while the other was recruited for primary root organogenesis.
June 2018
Photosynthetic Energy Transfer at the Quantum/Classical Border
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 6 Author(s): Nir Keren, Yossi Paltiel Quantum mechanics diverges from the classical description of our world when very small scales or very fast processes are involved. Unlike classical mechanics, quantum effects cannot be easily related to our everyday experience and are often counterintuitive to us. Nevertheless, the dimensions and time scales of the photosynthetic energy transfer processes puts them close to the quantum/classical border, bringing them into the range of measurable quantum effects. Here we review recent advances in the field and suggest that photosynthetic processes can take advantage of the sensitivity of quantum effects to the environmental noise as means of tuning exciton energy transfer efficiency. If true, this design principle could be a base for nontrivial coherent wave property nano-devices.
June 2018
Plants for Sustainable Improvement of Indoor Air Quality
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 6 Author(s): Federico Brilli, Silvano Fares, Andrea Ghirardo, Pieter de Visser, Vicent Calatayud, Amalia Mu
June 2018
ABA Transport and Plant Water Stress Responses
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 6 Author(s): Takashi Kuromori, Mitsunori Seo, Kazuo Shinozaki To understand the integrative networks of signaling molecules, the sites of their biosynthesis and action must be clarified, particularly for phytohormones such as abscisic acid (ABA). The relationship between the sites of ABA biosynthesis and transport has been discussed extensively in the context of guard cells and stomatal regulation. However, guard cells are not the only site of ABA action. Recent studies have reported multiple sites of ABA biosynthesis and multiple ABA transporters, indicating that ABA transport regulation is not unidirectional but rather forms complex networks. Therefore, it is important to determine how multiple ABA sources coordinately contribute to individual biological processes under various physiological conditions.
June 2018
Activation and Polarity Control of PIN-FORMED Auxin Transporters by Phosphorylation
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 6 Author(s): In
Available online 12 May 2018
Crops, Nitrogen, Water: Are Legumes Friend, Foe, or Misunderstood Ally?
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 6 Author(s): Mark A. Adams, Nina Buchmann, Janet Sprent, Thomas N. Buckley, Tarryn L. Turnbull Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) by crop legumes reduces demand for industrial nitrogen fixation (INF). Nonetheless, rates of BNF in agriculture remain low, with strong negative feedback to BNF from reactive soil nitrogen (N) and drought. We show that breeding for yield has resulted in strong relationships between photosynthesis and leaf N in non-leguminous crops, whereas grain legumes show strong relations between leaf N and water use efficiency (WUE). We contrast these understandings with other studies that draw attention to the water costs of grain legume crops, and their potential for polluting the biosphere with N. We propose that breeding grain legumes for reduced stomatal conductance can increase WUE without compromising production or BNF. Legume crops remain a better bet than relying on INF.
Available online 12 May 2018
The Spring of Systems Biology-Driven Breeding
Publication date: Available online 12 May 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science Author(s): J
May 2018
Adaptation to Phosphate Scarcity: Tips from Arabidopsis Roots
Publication date: Available online 12 May 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science Author(s): Dolores Guti
May 2018
Editorial Board and Contents
Publication date: May 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 5

May 2018
Climate Change and Insect Pests: Resistance Is Not Futile?
Publication date: May 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 5 Author(s): Scott N. Johnson, Tobias Z
May 2018
Ligands Switch Model for Pollen-Tube Integrity and Burst
Publication date: May 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 5 Author(s): Hong-Ju Li, Wei-Cai Yang In flowering plants, pollen tubes deliver and release the immotile sperms to the female gametes for fertilization, but mechanisms remain unclear. New results show that the RALF family peptides control pollen-tube integrity and burst by binding to CrRLK1L family receptors and cell wall leucine-rich repeat extensins.
May 2018
The APEX Approaches: A Unified LRR-RK Network Revealed
Publication date: May 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 5 Author(s): Yanyan Huang, Pierce Jamieson, Libo Shan Leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases (LRR-RKs) represent a large and functionally diverse family of transmembrane proteins critical for signal recognition and transduction at the plant cell plasma membrane. Here, we discuss a recent report which used a systems-level approach to validate key paradigms by constructing an LRR-RK interaction network model.
May 2018
CRISPR/Cas13 as a Tool for RNA Interference
Publication date: May 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 5 Author(s): Zahir Ali, Ahmed Mahas, Magdy Mahfouz Almost all biological processes involve RNA, making it crucial to develop tools for manipulation of the transcriptome. The bacterial CRISPR/Cas13 system was recently rewired to facilitate RNA manipulation in eukaryotes, including plants. We discuss here the opportunities and limitations of using CRISPR/Cas13 in plants for various types of RNA manipulation.
May 2018
From Petri Dishes to Model Ecosystems
Publication date: May 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 5 Author(s): Oskar Siemianowski, Kara R. Lind, Xinchun Tian, Matt Cain, Songzhe Xu, Baskar Ganapathysubramanian, Ludovico Cademartiri Model ecosystems could provide significant insight into the evolution and behavior of real ecosystems. We discuss the advantages and limitations of common approaches like mesocosms. In this context, we highlight recent breakthroughs that allow for the creation of networks of organisms with independently controlled environments and rates of chemical exchange.
May 2018
The Hidden Face of Rubisco
Publication date: May 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 5 Author(s): Mathieu Pottier, Dimitri Gilis, Marc Boutry Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) fixes atmospheric CO2 into organic compounds and is composed of eight copies each of a large subunit (RbcL) and a small subunit (RbcS). Recent reports have revealed unusual RbcS, which are expressed in particular tissues and confer higher catalytic rate, lesser affinity for CO2, and a more acidic profile of the activity versus pH. The resulting Rubisco was proposed to be adapted to a high CO2 environment and recycle CO2 generated by the metabolism. These RbcS belong to a cluster named T (for trichome), phylogenetically distant from cluster M, which gathers well-characterized RbcS expressed in mesophyll or bundle-sheath tissues. Cluster T is largely represented in different plant phyla, including pteridophytes and bryophytes, indicating an ancient origin.
May 2018
Gene Expression Dominance in Allopolyploids: Hypotheses and Models
Publication date: May 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 5 Author(s): Samuel Bottani, Nicolae Radu Zabet, Jonathan F. Wendel, Reiner A. Veitia The classical example of nonadditive contributions of the two parents to allopolyploids is nucleolar dominance, which entails silencing of one parental set of ribosomal RNA genes. This has been observed for many other loci. The prevailing explanation for this genome-wide expression disparity is that the two merged genomes differ in their transposable element (TE) complement and in their level of TE-mediated repression of gene expression. Alternatively, and not exclusively, gene expression dominance may arise from mismatches between trans effectors and their targets. Here, we explore quantitative models of regulatory mismatches leading to gene expression dominance. We also suggest that, when pairs of merged genomes are similar from one allopolyploidization event to another, gene-level and genome dominance patterns should also be similar.
May 2018
The Root Transition Zone: A Hot Spot for Signal Crosstalk
Publication date: May 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 5 Author(s): Xiangpei Kong, Guangchao Liu, Jiajia Liu, Zhaojun Ding The root transition zone (TZ), located between the apical meristem and basal elongation region, has a unique role in root growth and development. The root TZ is not only the active site for hormone crosstalk, but also the perception site for various environmental cues, such as aluminum (Al) stress and low phosphate (Pi) stress. We propose that the root TZ is a hot spot for the integration of diverse inputs from endogenous (hormonal) and exogenous (sensorial) stimuli to control root growth.
May 2018
Gibberellin Localization and Transport in Plants
Publication date: May 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 5 Author(s): Jenia Binenbaum, Roy Weinstain, Eilon Shani Distribution patterns and finely-tuned concentration gradients of plant hormones govern plant growth and development. Gibberellin (GA) is a plant hormone regulating key processes in plants; many of them are of significant agricultural importance, such as seed germination, root and shoot elongation, flowering, and fruit patterning. Although studies have demonstrated that GA movement is essential for multiple developmental aspects, how GAs are transported throughout the plant and where exactly they accumulate remain largely unknown. Here, we summarize recent findings from studies of GA movement and localization, and discuss the importance of GA intermediates in long- and short-distance movement. We further review recently identified Arabidopsis GA transporters and highlight their complex specialization and robust functional redundancy in GA transport activity.
May 2018
The C/S1 bZIP Network: A Regulatory Hub Orchestrating Plant Energy Homeostasis
Publication date: May 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 5 Author(s): Wolfgang Dr
May 2018
Mitophagy: A Mechanism for Plant Growth and Survival
Publication date: May 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 5 Author(s): Martyna Broda, A. Harvey Millar, Olivier Van Aken Mitophagy is a conserved cellular process that is important for autophagic removal of damaged mitochondria to maintain a healthy mitochondrial population. Mitophagy also appears to occur in plants and has roles in development, stress response, senescence, and programmed cell death. However, many of the genes that control mitophagy in yeast and animal cells are absent from plants, and no plant proteins marking defunct mitochondria for autophagic degradation are yet known. New insights implicate general autophagy-related proteins in mitophagy, affecting the senescence of plant tissues. Mitophagy control and its importance for energy metabolism, survival, signaling, and cell death in plants are discussed. Furthermore, we suggest mitochondrial membrane proteins containing ATG8-interacting motifs, which might serve as mitophagy receptor proteins in plant mitochondria.
April 2018
Translating High-Throughput Phenotyping into Genetic Gain
Publication date: May 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 5 Author(s): Jos
April 2018
Editorial Board and Contents
Publication date: April 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 4

April 2018
Triterpene Messages from the EU-FP7 Project TriForC
Publication date: April 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 4 Author(s): Alain Goossens, Anne Osbourn, Franck Michoux, S

A Bypass in Jasmonate Biosynthesis the OPR3-independent Formation
Publication date: April 2018
Source:Trends in Plant Science, Volume 23, Issue 4 Author(s): Claus Wasternack, Bettina Hause For the first time in 25 years, a new pathway for biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA) has been identified. JA production takes place via 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) including reduction by OPDA reductases (OPRs). A loss-of-function allele, opr3-3, revealed an OPR3-independent pathway converting OPDA to JA.
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