Journal Sciences News
Canadian Journal of Cardiology
June 2018
Female Health Across the Lifespan
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2 Author(s): Alice L. March
June 2018
Copyright
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2

June 2018
Contributors
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2

June 2018
Contents
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2

June 2018
Forthcoming Issues
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2

June 2018
Female Health Across the Lifespan
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2 Author(s): Alice L. March
June 2018
Urine Collection Methods in Children
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2 Author(s): Olivia Windham May

Teaser

Urinary tract infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in infants and young children. There are 5 collection methods commonly used to obtain a urine sample from an infant or small child: suprapubic aspiration, urethral catheterization, clean catch void, urine collection bag, and urine collection pad. Although invasive, suprapubic aspiration and urethral catheterization are less likely to cause contamination of the specimen. When deciding which method to use, providers must take into consideration the clinical presentation of a child as well as presenting and past medical history, while weighing benefits versus risks.
June 2018
Adolescent Confidentiality and Women’s Health
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2 Author(s): Naomi A. Schapiro, Jayme Mejia

Teaser

Adolescent access to reproductive health services, mental health services, and treatment of drug and alcohol use depends on teens’ rights to consent and confidentiality in the state in which they live. This article reviews the history, current practices, and potential challenges to confidentiality, including Title X funding, questions about brain development and ability to make autonomous choices, and meaningful use practices in electronic records. Resources are provided for professional position statements and individual state regulations.
June 2018
Integrating Optimal Screening, Intervention, and Referral for Postpartum Depression in Adolescents
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2 Author(s): Leigh Booth, Monika Wedgeworth, Adeline Turner

Teaser

According to the World Health Organization, 10% to 13% of postpartum women develop a mental disorder, mainly depression. This number is higher in developing countries. This percentage increases in adolescents and symptoms in adolescents tend to be overlooked. These disorders can be treated successfully if detected early, which will in turn prevent more severe symptoms from developing. This article provides evidence-based clinical best practices for the assessment and early recognition of postpartum depression, specifically in adolescents. In addition, suggestions for integration into practice and recommendations for interprofessional collaboration are discussed.
June 2018
Preconception Care for the Patient and Family
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2 Author(s): Elizabeth Hall, Robingale Panepinto, Elizabeth Keeley Bowman

Teaser

Preconception counseling is essential for women of childbearing age and family members who have decided to conceive because the level of well health of the mother and unborn child are affected by decisions and actions of the mother before and during pregnancy. Proactively planning pregnancy includes scheduling a preconception counseling consultation with a provider. Understanding physical, psychological, and emotional needs promotes healthy pregnancy outcomes for mother and baby. This article offers a reflective and holistic perspective of how health care providers frame, prioritize, and engage with the patient and family during the preconception consultation.
June 2018
Intimate Partner Violence
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2 Author(s): Anne McKibbin, Kathy Gill-Hopple

Teaser

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a health epidemic. Health care professionals have a unique and critical role to play. It is expected that health care providers have the ability to engage in an informed response to IPV, which is crucial to the safety of the woman, improving health outcomes, and preventing further violence. Screening procedures for IPV, along with the awareness of abuse indicators, have the potential to significantly identify women who have been exposed to IPV. Identification of IPV will enable the health care provider to offer support, build trust, validate concerns, and offer community resources.
June 2018
Common Sexually Transmitted Infections in Women
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2 Author(s): Ashley L. Hodges, Aimee Chism Holland

Teaser

The spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) remains a significant public health issue in the United States. Social, economic, and behavioral implications affecting the spread of STIs have been identified. The most important social factor in the United States is the stigma associated with discussing sex and STI screening. In this article, specific recommendations for women are included regarding screening, diagnosing, and treating common vaginal and cervical infections. Screening women for infections of the vagina and cervix is essential because untreated infections may result in complications that have current and long-term health consequences and impact quality of life.
June 2018
The Psychosocial and Clinical Well-Being of Women Living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/AIDS
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2 Author(s): Safiya George Dalmida, Kyle R. Kraemer, Stephen Ungvary, Elizabeth Di Valerio, Harold G. Koenig, Marcia McDonnell Holstad

Teaser

This study examined factors impacting the psychological well-being of women living with human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS and the impact of depression on clinical outcomes. Nearly two-thirds of participants in this cross-sectional study reported significant depressive symptoms. Compared with women living with human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS without depressive symptoms, those with depression reported significantly poorer health outcomes. Health care providers should regularly screen these women for and adequately treat depression, and must collaborate with mental health providers and pastoral care counselors to address the mental health needs of women living with human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS to optimize their human immunodeficiency virus-related outcomes.
June 2018
Health Care of Sexual Minority Women
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2 Author(s): Susan Jo Roberts

Teaser

Sexual minority women may be invisible in health care settings unless practitioners ask every patient about sexual attractions/behaviors and identity. Sexual minority women need to feel comfortable and able to share information about their sexual identity, partners, and lives. No medical diagnoses are found more commonly in sexual minority women, but problems such as overweight/obesity, increased tobacco and alcohol use, increased mental health problems, and a past history of childhood sexual abuse are common. These factors intertwine when treating sexual minority women.
June 2018
High-Risk Pregnancy
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2 Author(s): Nola Holness

Teaser

Any unexpected or unanticipated medical or obstetric condition associated with a pregnancy with an actual or potential hazard to the health or well-being of the mother or fetus is considered a high-risk pregnancy. There is no exact definition of risk in pregnancy, as risk may be perceived in different ways by the woman and her health care provider. Women with complicated pregnancies may require lifestyle changes, medication regimens, technical support, and even hospitalization. Nurses can foster an environment of security and trust during preconception, antenatal, intrapartal, and postnatal care to enhance the health and well-being of mother and fetus.
June 2018
Helping Mothers Reach Personal Breastfeeding Goals
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2 Author(s): Diane L. Spatz

Teaser

Professional organizations worldwide recommend exclusive human milk/breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life, and continued breastfeeding with appropriate complementary foods for 1 year or more. This article focuses on the importance of prenatal messaging and goal setting to ensure that mothers are able to optimize their milk supply during the critical window of opportunity in first 2 weeks after delivery. Research data in the United States indicate that the largest categories of why women stopped breastfeeding were for reasons related to milk supply or concerns that the infant was not getting enough nutrition or gaining enough weight.
June 2018
Menopause Symptom Management in the United Kingdom
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2 Author(s): Debra Holloway

Teaser

Menopause is a complex time in a woman’s life. It is an increasingly a midlife event, when health care professionals should be aiming to optimize a woman’s health for the next 30 years or so. Nurses need to be able to give up-to-date information and evidence for all forms of treatment based on a background of complex and ever-changing research. This article covers the main presenting complaints and treatments, from lifestyle to hormone replacement therapy, by drawing on guidelines from national bodies.
June 2018
Sexuality and Intimacy in the Older Adult Woman
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2 Author(s): Alice L. March

Teaser

In the United States, people older than 65 attend approximately 248 million health care visits each year, or 7 visits per older adult annually. One in every 5 older adults reports recent sexual activity, yet health care professionals do not ask, and patients do not tell when it comes to sexuality. The desire to engage in sex and intimate behaviors to meet important quality-of-life needs is present in people of all ages. Because it is important to communicate in a nonjudgmental manner, health care professionals must first examine their own personal attitudes and values regarding sexuality in older women.
March 2018
Person-Centered Care for Patients with Pessaries
Publication date: June 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 2 Author(s): Gwendolyn L. Hooper

Teaser

Pelvic organ prolapse is a common condition affecting women of any age but more likely to occur in the aging woman. Prolapse has a significant impact on quality of life, sexuality, and body image. Vaginal support pessaries have been used since ancient times and are a safe and effective nonsurgical treatment option. Fitting a pessary results in immediate symptom improvement. A comprehensive evaluation for pessary fitting is time intensive but necessary. Nurse providers perform direct pessary care and have a role in caring for women with prolapse expanding access to care. Caregiver and family involvement is important for pessary care and follow-up.
March 2018
Positive Living with HIV/AIDS
Publication date: March 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 1 Author(s): Kenneth D. Phillips, Teresa M. Stephens
March 2018
Copyright
Publication date: March 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 1

March 2018
Contributors
Publication date: March 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 1

March 2018
Contents
Publication date: March 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 1

March 2018
Forthcoming Issues
Publication date: March 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 1

March 2018
Positive Living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Publication date: March 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 1 Author(s): Kenneth D. Phillips
March 2018
Exercise and Positive Living in Human Immunodeficiency Virus/AIDS
Publication date: March 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 1 Author(s): Jason R. Jaggers

Teaser

Evidence would suggest that regardless of disease status, people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS can obtain similar health benefits from routine physical activity reported within general populations. Research has shown significant improvements among psychological and physiologic variables within the first 5 to 6 weeks of beginning a routine physical activity program. Daily activity has shown promising results in other clinical populations, but there is still a paucity of research that limits evidence among the HIV population. Additional research is needed to examine the long-term benefits of physical activity, and to discover more practical ways to achieve this lifestyle change.
March 2018
Nutritional Issues and Positive Living in Human Immunodeficiency Virus/AIDS
Publication date: March 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 1 Author(s): William Andrew Clark, Eileen M. Cress

Teaser

Nutritional counseling has been shown to improve dietary intake in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS. Registered dietitians/nutritionists can individualize diet interventions to optimize effectiveness in treating metabolic consequences of the HIV infection or highly active antiretroviral therapy. Nutrition management for individuals infected with HIV can be helpful in maintaining lean body weight, combating oxidative stress, reducing complications from hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, and managing gastrointestinal function. Consideration should be given to including the expertise of a registered dietitian/nutritionist.
March 2018
The Role of Faith-Based Organizations in the Education, Support, and Services for Persons Living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Publication date: March 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 1 Author(s): Teresa M. Stephens

Teaser

Faith-based organizations are in a unique position to provide resilience-enhancing efforts for persons living with human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS. Many persons living with human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS report having a strong faith or religious affiliation, with a large percentage attending church services on a regular basis. Faith-based organizations can use these factors to reach out to these individuals and effectively promote health, well-being, education, and support. Faith-based organizations can contribute to the reduction of stigma and isolation for persons living with human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS.
March 2018
Mindful Living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus and AIDS
Publication date: March 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 1 Author(s): Kate Hendricks Thomas, Justin T. McDaniel, Aaron J. Diehr, Kyleanne Hunter

Teaser

Complementary techniques are useful in treating adverse symptoms of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and AIDS, and in preventing disease spread by encouraging screening. This study indicates that HIV diagnosis rates are higher in states where behavioral medicine is practiced; participation in such activities may influence the extent to which someone might closely monitor personal health. A strong evidence-base exists for the recommendation of mindfulness practices that improve rates of primary preventive practices and self-reported quality of life for participants living with chronic conditions such as HIV and AIDS. Access to such programs is an area for future research and practice.
March 2018
Promoting Cardiovascular Health in Patients Living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Publication date: March 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 1 Author(s): Robin Harris

Teaser

Patients living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (PLWHA) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease because of advances in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome treatment and increased life expectancy. Cardiovascular health promotion in PLWHA includes strategies for risk factor reduction, disease prevention, early detection, and treatment of cardiovascular disease.
March 2018
Substance Use Disorders in People Living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/AIDS
Publication date: March 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 1 Author(s): Priyanka Amin, Antoine Douaihy

Teaser

Persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS have a substantial burden of co-occurring substance use disorders (SUDs); untreated alcohol and drug use disorders among people living with HIV/AIDS contribute to worse HIV care outcomes. SUDs are associated with key health behaviors and outcomes, including delays in seeking medical care, poor engagement in treatment, reduced adherence to medical treatment and antiretroviral therapy, immunosuppression, increased HIV transmission through risky sexual behaviors, and increased burdens on health care systems. HIV infection comorbid with SUD and a psychiatric disorder is a clinically challenging condition creating a complex set of medical and psychosocial challenges.
March 2018
Best Practices and Self-Care to Support Women in Living Well with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/AIDS
Publication date: March 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 1 Author(s): Melinda Ann Bogardus

Teaser

Women accounted for 20% of the cumulative AIDS cases in the United States as of 2015. Although their incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has declined in recent years, the rates of new infections and AIDS diagnoses for women of color have remained high. Women with HIV tend to be more vulnerable than men with this disease. They are more likely to be poor, uninsured, depressed, and homeless; to have experienced interpersonal violence; and to be caregivers. Attention to psychosocial needs and building trust are fundamental to engaging HIV-positive women in care and helping them attain optimal health.
March 2018
Management of Coinfections in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus
Publication date: March 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 1 Author(s): Sabra S. Custer

Teaser

In addition to chronic use of antiretrovirals to maintain suppression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), many persons living with HIV are coinfected with tuberculosis, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C. These coinfections can be successfully treated or managed alongside HIV infection. Clinicians should follow practice guidelines to appropriately screen patients with HIV for these coinfections and initiate treatment when necessary. The most significant concern when treating any of these coinfections is to avoid drug-drug interactions with the patient’s antiretrovirals. Several excellent practice guidelines exist for treatment of these common HIV coinfections.
March 2018
A Therapeutic Perspective of Living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/AIDS in 2017
Publication date: March 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 1 Author(s): David B. Cluck, Roxanne F. Underwood

Teaser

Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS live a far different life today compared with those who were infected in the 1980s and 1990s. Antiretroviral therapy has evolved from a once poorly tolerated, heavy pill burden to the availability of many once-daily single-tablet regimens. The improvements in therapy have necessitated the need to be cognizant of comorbidities as well as drug-drug interactions. Despite the tremendous advances in therapy, newer therapies are in the pipeline and continue to emerge, making care for patients burdened by HIV perhaps easier than it has ever been.
March 2018
Stigma and Discrimination
Publication date: March 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 1 Author(s): Richard L. Sowell

Teaser

Antiretroviral therapy and care advances have resulted in people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) living longer and enjoying a higher level of physical well-being. Despite such advances, individuals with HIV continue to confront challenges to living positively, including facing the secondary epidemic of stigma and discrimination. Following is a historical overview of the concept of stigma and an exploration of the causes and consequences of multilevel stigma for individuals with HIV. Strategies used by individuals and societies to manage stigma and avoid negative experiences also are examined.
December 2017
End-of-Life Care and Bereavement Issues in Human Immunodeficiency Virus–AIDS
Publication date: March 2018
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 53, Issue 1 Author(s): Karl Goodkin, Sindhura Kompella, Steven F. Kendell

Teaser

This review article addresses end-of-life care issues characterizing human immunodeficiency virus progression by delineating associated stages of medical and nursing care. The initial progression from primary medical and nursing care aimed at functional cure to palliative care is discussed. This transition is considered in accord with the major symptoms experienced, including fatigue, pain, insomnia; decreased libido, hypogonadism, memory, and concentration; depression; and distorted body image. From the stage of palliative care, progression is delineated onward through the stages of hospice care, death and dying, and the subsequent bereavement process.
December 2017
Glucose Regulation
Publication date: December 2017
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 52, Issue 4 Author(s): Celia Levesque
December 2017
Copyright
Publication date: December 2017
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 52, Issue 4

December 2017
Contributors
Publication date: December 2017
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 52, Issue 4

December 2017
Contents
Publication date: December 2017
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 52, Issue 4

December 2017
Forthcoming Issues
Publication date: December 2017
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 52, Issue 4

December 2017
Diabetes: A Health Threat on the Rise
Publication date: December 2017
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 52, Issue 4 Author(s): Stephen D. Krau
December 2017
Glucose Regulation
Publication date: December 2017
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 52, Issue 4 Author(s): Celia Levesque
December 2017
Management of Type 1 Diabetes
Publication date: December 2017
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 52, Issue 4 Author(s): Anne Kay Brinkman

Teaser

Comprehensive type 1 diabetes management requires understanding of the pathophysiology of disease and the ability to contrast this process with type 2 diabetes. Nurses are often the first contact with patients and must be aware of the advancements in detection, therapies, and signs of complications in these patients. Individuals with type 1 diabetes are at high risk for glycemic complications caused by potentially preventable errors in medication administration, which can be mitigated with appropriate education.
December 2017
The How-To for Type 2
Publication date: December 2017
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 52, Issue 4 Author(s): Seliece Dodds

Teaser

This article presents an overview of type 2 diabetes diagnosis and management. A brief discussion of epidemiology, including incidence, prevalence, and etiology, provides the basis for the importance of the discussion. The review then proceeds to outline diagnostic criteria and follow-up monitoring guidelines. Recommendations for evidence-based lifestyle measures and current pharmacologic options are addressed. A priority on individualized, holistic care with patient-specified goals and the management of comorbidities is emphasized.
December 2017
Noninsulin Diabetes Medications
Publication date: December 2017
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 52, Issue 4 Author(s): Sigi Varghese

Teaser

Pharmacotherapy for diabetes has changed greatly owing to drugs and drug classes available. There are 11 classes of noninsulin diabetes medications available in the United States. With the use of 1 drug alone or in combination with different drugs, it is possible to improve glycemic control in patients with diabetes. Important properties of antidiabetic agents play a role in the choice of that particular medication for individual patients. Prescribing a diabetes medication regimen is based careful assessment of patient needs, and consideration of the medication’s efficacy, impact on weight, hypoglycemia risk, potential side effects, cost, and patient preferences.
December 2017
Insulin Therapy
Publication date: December 2017
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 52, Issue 4 Author(s): Veronica J. Brady

Teaser

Since its development, insulin therapy has been a mainstay in the arsenal of every practitioner battling against diabetes. For patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, insulin is essential for survival, and for those with type 2 diabetes mellitus, as the disease progresses, it may become a necessary addition to treatment. The goal of this article is to discuss insulin therapies that are currently available for use in the management of diabetes, from the old to the new and novel, and briefly discuss insulin use in special populations.
December 2017
A Primer on Insulin Pump Therapy for Health Care Providers
Publication date: December 2017
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 52, Issue 4 Author(s): Deborah L. McCrea

Teaser

An estimated 1 million people use an insulin pump to manage their diabetes. Few medical professionals understand or feel comfortable caring for people who use an insulin pump. This article will help the medical professional understand the reasons why the insulin pump helps the user to achieve better glycemic control, have more flexibility, and enjoy a better quality of life. Additionally, this article discusses the advantages, disadvantages, candidate selection, contraindications, basic functions, and troubleshooting of the insulin pump.
December 2017
Hypoglycemia in Diabetes
Publication date: December 2017
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 52, Issue 4 Author(s): Marjorie R. Ortiz

Teaser

Hypoglycemia is a common problem in patients with diabetes, and often limits those trying to achieve tight glucose control. Achieving optimal glucose control is necessary to prevent microvascular complications. Hypoglycemia can cause mild disturbances to daily life, but in severe cases can be fatal. Patient education of hypoglycemic medications, risk factors, contributing factors, and prevention strategies should be included in the care plan of patients at risk of developing hypoglycemia.

Management Strategies for Patients with Diabetic Kidney Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease in Diabetes
Publication date: December 2017
Source:Nursing Clinics of North America, Volume 52, Issue 4 Author(s): Jessica K. Yakush Williams

Teaser

Diabetes mellitus is a leading cause of chronic kidney disease, prompting the need for monitoring and management of this complex condition in those diagnosed with diabetes. Management is often multifaceted and includes lifestyle modification, management of hyperglycemia, and management of hypertension and hyperlipidemia to slow progression of kidney disease and to mitigate cardiovascular risks associated with diabetes and kidney disease. This article reviews the current literature regarding monitoring and management of diabetic kidney disease and chronic kidney disease in diabetes.
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